CMCO food delivery: Try out the Hong Kong-style 'wanton' noodles from PJ SS2's Ming Chai Kee

If you're undecided what to eat, order the three toppings noodles with minced fish ball, prawn 'wantons' and tender beef slices. – Pictures by Lee Khang Yi
If you're undecided what to eat, order the three toppings noodles with minced fish ball, prawn 'wantons' and tender beef slices. – Pictures by Lee Khang Yi

PETALING JAYA, Oct 21 — I stumbled upon Ming Chai Kee via WhatsApp when a friend forwarded me their menu. It caught my interest since they were serving Hong Kong-style wanton noodles.

From browsing through their Facebook page, I understand the owner cum chef used to operate at the food court in Mid Valley Megamall. Nowadays, the business is based out of PJ SS2 and only offers delivery services.

You have a choice of selecting either lunch or dinner for your orders. For lunch, orders must be placed by 11.30pm the night before. Delivery for lunch is between 12pm to 2.30pm.

Pig out with their extremely laden pork lard noodles that is served with a generous portion of lard fritters, sliced pork loin and pork belly with pig skin (left). They offer a variety of fried noodles such as this classic spring onion beef ginger 'kway teow' which came with a generous portion of tender beef slices (right).
Pig out with their extremely laden pork lard noodles that is served with a generous portion of lard fritters, sliced pork loin and pork belly with pig skin (left). They offer a variety of fried noodles such as this classic spring onion beef ginger 'kway teow' which came with a generous portion of tender beef slices (right).

Usually once you confirm the order, they let you know the estimated time it will be delivered. Like mine was from 1pm to 1.15pm. It was slightly late by five minutes but they told me once it was on the way.

If you opt for dinner, it is delivered between 6pm to 8pm. Orders for dinner service must be placed by 2pm the same day.

The highlight is their incredibly fine wanton noodles. This is paired with various toppings such as prawn wantons, minced fish ball or beef slices.

If you're undecided, go for the three toppings noodles that combines all three items. It's RM16.90 for the regular portion. There are also interesting noodles like their pork lard noodles and fried sauce noodles.

Their homemade pork spring rolls are addictive with a filling of minced meat and carrots.
Their homemade pork spring rolls are addictive with a filling of minced meat and carrots.

Since I wanted everything, I zoomed in on the three toppings noodles. My order arrived with the dry items separated and I just added the soup.

Even though it was separated, I felt the fine noodles were a little overcooked and lacked that crunchiness that I like from the kan sui or alkaline water used.

The clear pork bone soup was good though and came with a slight aroma from dried flounder fish. They also serve the noodles with a super spicy chilli oil too which is great for those who enjoy their chillies.

Prawn 'wantons' served here are stuffed with prawns and have the requisite goldfish tail shape for the wrapper (left). The wantons have a nice translucent look but were slightly overcooked (right).
Prawn 'wantons' served here are stuffed with prawns and have the requisite goldfish tail shape for the wrapper (left). The wantons have a nice translucent look but were slightly overcooked (right).

Nevertheless, the star of the show was actually the minced fish balls. These chunky babies had a really nice, rough texture indicating that these were handmade.

I liked the savoury taste of the bouncy fish balls studded with cut mushrooms that lent an umaminess to each bite. Delicious!

I also ordered the prawn wantons (RM12.90 for six pieces). They were all plump with just prawns inside and the requisite goldfish tail shape from the corners of the wrapper.

Their noodles have a very fine texture (left). Pork dumplings are well stuffed with minced pork, prawns and crunchy wood ear fungus (right).
Their noodles have a very fine texture (left). Pork dumplings are well stuffed with minced pork, prawns and crunchy wood ear fungus (right).

However, I felt the texture was a little too soft for my liking. It was similar to the pork dumplings (RM8 for three pieces) or sui gao. These were well stuffed with minced pork, prawns and sliced black wood ear fungus but a tad overcooked.

Maybe the residual heat from the soup it was served with cooked them further during delivery.

Instead I fared better with the pork spring rolls (three pieces for RM8). Even though they weren't super crispy, I really loved the taste of the stuffing made with minced meat with carrots. It was so addictive that I didn't need the chilli sauce they gave,

You can also order 'tong sui' like this walnut dessert (front) or almond dessert (back) (left). Everything is packed neatly in boxes and the soup noodles are separated from the liquid (right)
You can also order 'tong sui' like this walnut dessert (front) or almond dessert (back) (left). Everything is packed neatly in boxes and the soup noodles are separated from the liquid (right)

Aside from the soup noodles, I had decided to try their pork lard version (RM12.90 for a small portion). I opted for the dry version and this was better as the fine stands were springy.

It came laden with crispy pork lard. Toss it with the mixture of sliced pork belly, pork loin and pig skin, served on the side for a delicious feast. 

There is also a choice of fried noodles such as their signature noodles using noodles imported from Hong Kong. Since that is for two to three people, I didn't order that.

The 'wantons' and pork dumplings are served with the clear pork bone soup while the spring rolls are kept whole.
The 'wantons' and pork dumplings are served with the clear pork bone soup while the spring rolls are kept whole.

Instead I decided to sample the spring onion ginger beef kway teow (RM16.90). The portion is huge with many slices of tender beef. The noodles lacked wok hei but the sauce is a tasty one when paired with the flat rice noodles.

Last but not least, they also offer a variety of sweet soups or tong sui. Choose between almond, walnut, black sesame and peanut. Prices range from RM5.50 to RM7.

Mix up the sauce for the beef noodles with the cooked 'kway teow' strands (left). If you wish to save water, just eat off the 'tong sui' straight out of the plastic containers (right).
Mix up the sauce for the beef noodles with the cooked 'kway teow' strands (left). If you wish to save water, just eat off the 'tong sui' straight out of the plastic containers (right).

The almond dessert has a thick texture with a faint aroma of the Chinese almonds. The walnut tong sui was fragrant with the nuts and not as thick as I expected, making it a pleasant way to end my meal from Ming Chai Kee.

If you prefer it without any sugar, they can also customise the taste to your liking. They also offer mango sago pomelo dessert too.

Ming Chai Kee, SS2, Petaling Jaya. You can place an order via WhatsApp to 018-2786183. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Ming-Chai-Kee-106607174373385

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