MBSJ planted more than 150,000 new trees in 2020 as part of commitment to sustainability

The Council estimates the new trees will absorb a total of 16,309 tonnes of carbon dioxide. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ
The Council estimates the new trees will absorb a total of 16,309 tonnes of carbon dioxide. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ

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PETALING JAYA, March 22 — The Subang Jaya City Council (MBSJ) planted a total of 150,705 new trees last year as part of its efforts to green up the city, exceeding its annual target of 80,000 new trees.

The council said 35.2 per cent of trees in the city were maintained and a total of 16,309 tonnes of carbon dioxide is estimated to be absorbed by the new trees.

It is one of many green initiatives that have been rolled out as part of its commitment to sustainability.

MBSJ also cultivated an urban forest in USJ 3 that is home to various plant species, herbs and ornamental plants to increase biodiversity in urban areas.

The SJ River Front rejuvenation project at USJ 1 and PJS, Subang Jaya is one of many green initiatives by MBSJ. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ
The SJ River Front rejuvenation project at USJ 1 and PJS, Subang Jaya is one of many green initiatives by MBSJ. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ

Residents living along the riverbanks of USJ 1 and PJS, Subang Jaya may have noticed the SJ River Front rejuvenation project that was introduced to create a green and conducive environment for the community.

Subang residents with green fingers or those keen to learn more about urban farming are encouraged to join any of the 65 community gardens the council has set up in various designated open spaces within the city.

Residents have been able to harvest a myriad of herbs, vegetables and fruits thanks to the many community gardens that have sprung up.

The council also implemented a seed swap programme allowing the community and MBSJ to share seeds from their favourite plants and trees to encourage crop growing within their respective residential premises.

There are 65 community gardens for Subang Jaya residents to carry out urban farming activities. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ
There are 65 community gardens for Subang Jaya residents to carry out urban farming activities. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ

To get the next generation to take part in sustainable activities, tree planting at schools through the Smart Generation programme is one way of instilling environmental values early on.

To date, a total of 41 school community gardens from 79 schools have been developed by students and teachers with the council’s assistance.

“All the efforts mentioned above reflect the high commitment of the council making MBSJ a green and sustainable city.

“We hope the public views this policy in a positive light and that care is given to the issue of environmental well-being as well as being responsible for maintaining the harmony of the neighbourhood collectively,” MBSJ said in a statement.

The Smart Generation school community garden programme was developed by students and teachers with the help of MBSJ. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ
The Smart Generation school community garden programme was developed by students and teachers with the help of MBSJ. — Picture courtesy of MBSJ

Following a report published by Malay Mail last week on the planting of trees and plants in public spaces outside one’s home, the council said it had no objections to residents who wish to grow trees and other crops within their residential premises so long as it doesn’t cause disturbance to the neighbourhood.

MBSJ reminded residents that placing pots and planting crops in back alleys, front yards outside one’s home and playgrounds without permission, monitoring and care is an offence.

The council said it often receives complaints from the community pertaining to the placement of plants in these shared spaces.

“This has become a disturbance to the neighbourhood, safety hazard, breeding place for Aedes mosquitoes, an obstruction of maintenance work of ditches and back alleys, and at the same time incurring additional costs of tree maintenance to the council.”

Section (4) of the Parks By-Laws (MPSJ) 2005 prohibits residents to dig up any soil or remove grassy soil in open spaces, green areas and buffer zones under the council’s administration.

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