Cyclists draw flak from social media users after seen beating red light in Kemaman (VIDEO)

Footage of the video posted by Arif Billah shows a group of cyclists beating the red traffic lights. —Twitter screengrab
Footage of the video posted by Arif Billah shows a group of cyclists beating the red traffic lights. —Twitter screengrab

PETALING JAYA, Aug 13 — A video of cyclists flouting traffic rules in Terengganu drew the ire of social media users on Twitter.

The 15-second video that was posted by Arif Billah, 35, showed a group of cyclists zooming on, ignoring the red light at an intersection in Kemaman, Terengganu.

Footage of the video showed three cyclists speeding past the traffic lights, followed by two others from the back.

Arif, who is also a triathlete and has cycled in many events, said that he found the video in a community cycling group and felt the need to share the video to spread awareness about safety when cycling.

“I had to share the one-week old video because I wanted to encourage cyclists to follow the traffic rules wherever they go.

 

 

“Usually, the ones who flout the rules are the newbies to cycling or those from the middle and upper class who can afford the expensive bicycles and the cycling lifestyles that complement it.

“Getting a bicycle is a trend right now, but many still don’t have the discipline to abide by the rules,” he told Malay Mail.

Arif commented on his Twitter account that many experienced cyclists would usually follow the rules unlike those who have recently joined the sport.

“If our national cyclists can follow the rules, why can’t these newbies?”

Many social media users voiced how upset they were at the behaviour of cyclists flouting the traffic rules and not sticking to their own bicycle lanes from their personal experiences.

Twitter user wirahylia for one said: “There are many cyclists in Putrajaya especially who are constantly using the main road when they have their own cycling lanes instead.”

The video has been viewed over 200,000 times and has been retweeted over 7,000 times.

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