No conflict of interest in police co-op, come see for yourself, deputy IGP tells C4

Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor speaks during a press conference in Kuala Lumpur June 26, 2019. — Picture by Firdaus Latif
Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor speaks during a press conference in Kuala Lumpur June 26, 2019. — Picture by Firdaus Latif

KUALA LUMPUR, June 26 — Any groups who are concerned about a possible conflict of interest arising from police running businesses through the Police Co-operative (KPD) can seek a clearer explanation of existing regulations from the men in blue themselves, said the Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor.

This was in response to a recent statement by the Centre to Combat Corruption and Cronyism (C4), who expressed worries over possible abuses of power that could lead to corruption when law enforcement agencies get themselves involved with businesses.

Mazlan explained how the KDP was formed upon a set of laws and conditions as stipulated in the Co-operatives Society Act 1963, a regulation that is adhered to by co-ops of other agencies as well.

“In that branch (of the Act), there are many bylaws, bylaws that we formed to make sure there are no incidents or instances that can lead to or involve the issues as mentioned by the NGO.

“If they (NGOs) don’t understand, they can come and meet our people and we can give them a clearer explanation (about the regulations).

“It is good that those people (from the NGOs) come forward, and we explain to them,” said Mazlan after attending the officiating of KPD’s 84th Annual Grand Meeting at the Kuala Lumpur International Hotel this morning.

Also present during the officiating earlier was Inspector-General of Police Datuk Seri Hamid Bador, and co-op chairman Datuk Seri Ayub Yaakob.

IGP Datuk Seri Abdul Hamid Bador (centre) attends the Police Co-operative’s 84th Annual Grand Meeting in Kuala Lumpur June 26, 2019. — Picture by Firdaus Latif
IGP Datuk Seri Abdul Hamid Bador (centre) attends the Police Co-operative’s 84th Annual Grand Meeting in Kuala Lumpur June 26, 2019. — Picture by Firdaus Latif

It was revealed today that KPD recorded a profit of RM62 million for 2018, with its current assets’ valuation standing at RM1.16 billion.

Dividends amounting to RM26.8 million will be paid out to its 101,580 members within the next two weeks, it was also announced earlier today.

Mazlan today also touched on how existing laws were also put in place to ensure integrity is maintained within the force and the co-op, saying the KPD’s management always kept a close watch on members concerning matters of integrity and trustworthiness.

“If what they (corrupt officers) do goes against having integrity or being trustworthy, we have specific mediums such as taking legal action, or lodging a police report, and many more that will ultimately see us investigate the matter.

“Whoever is involved, I am sorry to say, you will be prosecuted and will have to face the law,” he said.

Last week, C4 had expressed their concerns of possible corruption arising from enforcement agencies running businesses following a report that detailed how 67 associations were registered under the Royal Malaysian Police (RMP).

The NGO had said the appointment of ranking officers still in the force into positions within businesses opened opportunities for corrupt practices, saying a conflict of interest is bound to happen when the two elements mixed.

However, home minister had come out to defend the police saying it was perfectly legal and that there was nothing wrong with police engaging in businesses through KPD.

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