Cops confirm Mat Sabu's son charged in court

Mohamad Sabu's son Ahmad Saiful was arrested on January 5 during an early-morning police raid after he tested positive for drugs. — Picture by Shafwan Zaidon
Mohamad Sabu's son Ahmad Saiful was arrested on January 5 during an early-morning police raid after he tested positive for drugs. — Picture by Shafwan Zaidon

KUALA LUMPUR, June 19 — The police have confirmed that minister Mohamad Sabu's son was charged in court last Thursday, local news agencies have reported.

Datuk Kamarulzaman Mamat, acting director of Bukit Aman's Narcotic Crimes Investigation Department, reportedly confirmed to reporters that Ahmad Saiful Islam Mohamad was charged on June 13 at the Kuala Lumpur court complex.

According to news agency Astro Awani, Ahmad Saiful Islam pleaded not guilty and was allowed bail at RM3,000.

Local daily Harian Metro quoted Kamarulzaman as saying today: "The accused is waiting for trial at the Kuala Lumpur courts."

Malay Mail's check on the list of court cases at the Magistrate Court in Kuala Lumpur on June 13 shows a case involving an individual named Ahmad Saiful Islam Mohamad, scheduled at 2pm before magistrate Mohamad Aizat Abdul Rahim at the Majistret Jenayah 8 courtroom.

According to the courts' e-filing system, the next court date for Ahmad Saiful Islam's case is on July 9 before the same judge in the same courtroom.

It is currently unclear what Ahmad Saiful Islam was charged with, but he was arrested on January 5 during an early-morning police raid of an entertainment centre along Jalan Ampang after he tested positive for drugs in preliminary tests.

Malay Mail has reached out to Mohamad's office regarding the matter.

Mohamad Sabu, who is Malaysia's defence minister, is currently in France on his first official visit to the country, with the trip from June 16 to June 21 aimed at strengthening the two nations' bilateral ties.

Mohamad had on January 5 personally confirmed his son Ahmad Saiful Islam's arrest, also saying then that he was leaving it to the authorities to act according to the existing legal process and that his son is subject to the country's laws like others.

On January 9, Mohamad was reported saying that he would not attempt to protect his son from the law and that there would be "no special treatment", adding that the law should take its course and that ministers do not take up their positions in order to protect their children.

The police had then said that there would be no double standard if the chemist's report — reportedly taking up one to three months to be completed — shows the urine sample as testing positive for drugs.

In April, Home Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin in a parliamentary reply confirmed that the police had received the chemist's report and sent the investigation papers to the Attorney General's Chambers.

Muhyiddin did not name the minister's son involved in the drug case, but said instructions have been received to charge the suspect and that it would be done soon.

Muhyiddin had said the minister's son was investigated under Section 15(1)(a) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.

Under Section 15(1)(a), anyone who consumes or administers or allows others to administer any dangerous drug specified under the Dangerous Drugs Act commits an offence and is liable upon conviction to a maximum fine of RM5,000 or to a maximum two-year jail term.

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