Malaysia 10th most generous country, survey shows

According to the survey, Malaysians score well for donating funds, placing 17th, and helping strangers, ranked 27th, but the proportion of Malaysians spending time for volunteer work fell from 41 per cent to 37 per cent. — Picture by Choo Choy May
According to the survey, Malaysians score well for donating funds, placing 17th, and helping strangers, ranked 27th, but the proportion of Malaysians spending time for volunteer work fell from 41 per cent to 37 per cent. — Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 11 — Malaysia was ranked the 10th most charitable country out of 145 nations in a survey, falling three places from last year.

The World Giving Index 2015 by UK-based charity Charities Aid Foundation, which used surveys carried out by polling company Gallup, measured the countries in volunteering, helping strangers and donating money.

According to the survey, Malaysians score well for donating funds, placing 17th, and helping strangers, ranked 27th, but the proportion of Malaysians spending time for volunteer work fell from 41 per cent to 37 per cent.

Neighbouring Singapore ranked 34th, Thailand at 19th, and Indonesia at the 22nd place.

The top spot goes to Myanmar for the third year running. According to the report, 92 per cent of its people donated money in 2014 and while the donations tended to be small, many gave daily.

The least charitable nation in the survey is Burundi in Eastern Africa.

According to its website, the CAF World Giving Index, now in its sixth year, provides a picture of charitable behaviour across the world by measuring three different kinds of giving.

“This year there are encouraging signs that, despite continuing economic uncertainty, people are more willing to donate money. Young people especially are participating more in all three kinds of giving than any other age group,” said the report.

It noted that despite G20’s highly developed economies, only five countries from the category are in this year’s top 20, proving that economic prosperity does not automatically lead to a rise in generosity.

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