Charlie Hebdo terror attack can happen in Malaysia, says minister

French police and police investigators inspect the scene after an attack at a kebab restaurant near el Houda mosque in Villefrance-Sur-Saone near Lyon January 8, 2015 the day after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo. — Reuters pic
French police and police investigators inspect the scene after an attack at a kebab restaurant near el Houda mosque in Villefrance-Sur-Saone near Lyon January 8, 2015 the day after a shooting at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo. — Reuters pic

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KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 9 — The terror attack against French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo that left 12 dead could happen in Malaysia, Defence Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein warned today.

News portal Malaysiakini reported Hishammuddin as saying that he had a discussion with intelligence agencies in Paris and London last month and said the shootings at Charlie Hebdo’s Paris offices Wednesday were not unexpected.

“Don’t take it lightly that what was faced by that country (France) is not impossible for us to face (here),” Hishammuddin was quoted telling reporters.

Hishammuddin reportedly said Malaysia should boost security measures, especially in Sabah’s coasts that have previously been breached by militants from southern Philippines.

Malaysiakini also quoted the minister as saying that the country’s national security will be raised for discussion at the weekly post-Cabinet meeting.

UK daily the Guardian reported today that France has launched a manhunt for two brothers suspected of being behind the deadliest attack that the European country has witnessed in 50 years.

The third suspect, an 18-year-old man, has reportedly surrendered.

US paper the New York Times reported yesterday that one of the two brothers, Said Kouachi, had received terrorist training from Al-Qaeda in Yemen. 

US news network CNN reported yesterday Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins as saying that the gunmen had said they were avenging Prophet Muhammad and had shouted “Allahu akbar” (God is great).

Charlie Hebdo, which satirises Islam and other religions, has printed a stream of controversial cartoons of Prophet Muhammad. Depictions of the prophet are prohibited in Islam.

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