PARIS, Aug 13 — TikTok is the social network of all trends, from the fun, to the crazy to the outright dangerous.

The latest trending hack in the beauty department is to use glycolic acid as a deodorant. But it’s not as good an idea as it might seem.

Ever in search of the most effective deodorant with the least amount of unhealthy chemicals, TikTokers have made popular a new technique that supposedly eliminates all underarm odours.

Glycolic acid, an exfoliating product originally used as a facial care product, is all the rage on the Chinese social network, and is now being touted as a healthy alternative to keeping sweaty odours at bay.

Users are praising its benefits, explaining that they have replaced their usual deodorants with glycolic acid and are delighted with the results. One such user is @calistatee, whose video has been viewed more than 130,000 times Glycolic acid is used on the skin in many applications. Whether it’s to fight acne, get a radiant complexion or exfoliate skin, this product has various uses that have made it an essential in the skincare routine of women and men.

On TikTok, the hashtag #glycolicadic groups together all the tips for using the product — on the face or under the armpits — and has nearly 260 million views.

Regarding its deodorant virtues, this product supposedly absorbs all the bad smells emanating from the zone, but does not reduce perspiration... which is perhaps not all that practical in summer when we’re more likely to sweat.

On paper, the idea seems natural and safe, but this trick is not recommended by dermatologists. Indeed, if used every day or several times a week, glycolic acid has a strong irritating effect, especially under the arms where the skin is thinner.

In high doses, it causes redness and irritation, especially when applied alone, without any other product.

Used once a week as a deodorant, there would be little risk, but this product is not recommended to replace your usual daily deodorant.

In the end, this is perhaps another TikTok trick that we could have done without, a bit like the garlic up the nose trend that emerged at the beginning of the year. — ETX Studio