Conserve coastal wetlands for migratory bird species, says Malaysian Nature Society

File picture of the Penaga Mangrove. MNS has called for the government and Malaysians to protect migratory bird species by better preserving their natural habitat in the country’s coastal wetlands. — Picture by KE Ooi
File picture of the Penaga Mangrove. MNS has called for the government and Malaysians to protect migratory bird species by better preserving their natural habitat in the country’s coastal wetlands. — Picture by KE Ooi

KUALA LUMPUR, May 10 — The Malaysian Nature Society (MNS) has called for the government and Malaysians to protect migratory bird species by better preserving their natural habitat in the country’s coastal wetlands.

In conjunction with yesterday’s World Migratory Bird Day themed “Birds Connect Our World”, MNS president Ahmad Ismail, in a statement today said the society wants Malaysians to fully appreciate nature and celebrate the fascinating phenomenon of bird migration.

“Each year, migratory birds travel thousands of kilometres between the northern and southern hemispheres, stopping along coastal mudflats to roost, feed and rest before continuing their journey.

“Unfortunately, for the migratory bird looking to feed on molluscs and invertebrates to survive, the two sites (the North Central Selangor coast and Teluk Air Tawar-Kuala Muda coast) are facing threats from coastal development, aquaculture, water pollution and plastic waste,” he said.

MNS also urged the public to be involved in migratory waterbird conservation by participating in activities and being a part of the Society’s Flyway Campaign which collaborates with local communities, government agencies and corporations to run various citizens’ science activities such as the Asian Waterbird Census and Raptor Count.

MNS also calls on the government to prioritise nomination of the North Central Selangor coast as a flyaway site and encourage research in the wetlands of Teluk Air Tawar-Kuala Muda, towards better protection for the species.

Malaysia has been one of the government partners of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership since 2012 and yet the only designated flyway site thus far is Bako-Buntal Bay. — Bernama

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