Special screening of ‘Guang’ to raise awareness on autism

Kyo Chen with his fans at ISNC’s special screening of Guang at GSC, Damansara 3 in Petaling Jaya December 19, 2018. — Picture courtesy of ISNC
Kyo Chen with his fans at ISNC’s special screening of Guang at GSC, Damansara 3 in Petaling Jaya December 19, 2018. — Picture courtesy of ISNC

PETALING JAYA, Jan 2 — A special screening of award-winning film Guang at GSC, 3 Damansara Shopping Mall was held on December 19, 2018 to create greater awareness on autism. It was an evening to remember for the 200 guests of Dika College and International Special Needs Children (ISNC) especially with the presence of Guang lead actor Kyo Chen and producer Sabrina Wong.

Chen, who won the Best New Actor award for his portrayal of Weng Guang in the film at the 13th Chinese Youth Generation Film Forum in Wuhan, China, said he accepted the invitation by Dika College and ISNC as he wanted to make a difference.

In the film, Weng Guang plays a young man struggling with autism, who tries looking for a job to help his family but faces numerous obstacles. Unknown to those around him, however, he has a special gift for music.

“As actors, we have a chance to make a change and this is an opportunity to support a cause which affects many,” said Chen, 29, at the screening of the film.

“I am also glad the organisers decided to support a local film,” he said, referring to Dika College and ISNC’s decision to embark on the special screening of the film which is part of a corporate social responsibility programme ahead of the school’s opening this month.

Wong said she hopes the film, which is set in Kuala Lumpur, will increase awareness on autism and how it affects people.

“We should treat everyone the same, regardless if they are special or not,” she added.

ISNC founder Dr Sim Quan Seng said the special screening of the film was for their guests comprising business associates, vendors and college students as they want more people to be enlightened about autism and to experience the real struggles faced by them and their families.

“We hope to spread similar awareness when our school opens next month, he said, adding that profits generated by the school will be channelled back into research and development for people with special needs.

Co-founder Low Lay Har said people should take the cue from the strong message in the film that those with special needs are intelligent but may find it difficult to fit into society.

“The movie certainly touched me and it shows that those who are not special have to be more understanding and should never look down on those who are not like them,” said Low.

(From left) Nisha, Dika advisor Jenny Sim, ISNC co-founder Pua Chee Ling, Sabrina Wong, Kyo Chen, ISNC founder Dr Sim Quan Seng, Veronica Sim,  ISNC co-founder Low Lay Har and Tris. — Picture courtesy of ISNC
(From left) Nisha, Dika advisor Jenny Sim, ISNC co-founder Pua Chee Ling, Sabrina Wong, Kyo Chen, ISNC founder Dr Sim Quan Seng, Veronica Sim, ISNC co-founder Low Lay Har and Tris. — Picture courtesy of ISNC

Those who watched the film during the special screening said it was a brilliant film that would create more awareness on autism.

Mok Choon Keat, an investment management adviser, said he has never dealt with anyone with autism and never knew how challenging it is for them.

“I’ve always known that we have to treat them with respect but after watching this film, I realised we have to really understand those with special needs better.

“I would not have watched the film had ISNC not organised this special screening,” he said, adding that the film has certainly inspired him to learn more about those with special needs.

Human resource executive Jasmine Manuel, a special needs educator for the past 16 years, said many do not know the real struggles faced by families of those with special needs.

“I was touched by the movie as it really made me laugh and cry... the lead actor has certainly done a lot of research to get into his role.

“This screening is an opportunity for many to learn about the everyday challenges faced by those with special needs and how there is a need to understand them better,” she added.

ISNC is a special needs school which aims to help children between the ages of seven and 12 who have learning difficulties, behavioural challenges, issues with attention and other development disabilities.

ISNC is supported by Dika College, a pioneer in early childhood education and special needs education. The college provides support and knowledge to ISNC through a team of academics and industry experts. Dika College’s chief executive Pua Chee Ling and directors Dr Sim Quan Seng and Low Lay Har are the three co-founders of ISNC.

Pua said ISNC acts as a one-stop centre for academics and therapy for children with special needs.

“It is a challenge for parents to find a one-stop centre which caters for both academics and therapy for children with special needs and we are here to offer this solution.

“We aim to help these children become independent so they will be able to integrate with the community.

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