US writer’s MH370 claims ‘shallow’, says Malaysian investigator

Khalil was one of the investigating officers involved in unravelling the mystery of the missing plane and all 239 people on board. — Picture by Ben Tan
Khalil was one of the investigating officers involved in unravelling the mystery of the missing plane and all 239 people on board. — Picture by Ben Tan

KUALA LUMPUR, June 20 — Johor police chief Datuk Mohd Khalil Kader Mohd has dismissed US writer William Langewiesche’s recent article on the mysterious disappearance of Flight MH370 as a baseless diatribe against Malaysia.

Khalil, one of the investigating officers involved in unravelling the mystery of the missing plane and all 239 people on board, said Langewiesche — regarded in the aviation industry as an expert as he had worked as a commercial pilot — had made accusations that were pure conjecture, New Straits Times reported today.

“How can he touch on or discuss the investigative process when he does not know anything about it? I believe he does not have an iota of evidence but has accused the police of hiding facts.

“The reasoning Langewiesche puts forth in the article is shallow, based entirely on conjecture and pure assumptions. There’s nothing constructive in the article,” Khalil was quoted as saying in response to Langewiesche’s lengthy article for the July issue of The Atlantic magazine, titled “What Really Happened to Malaysia’s Missing Plane”.

Khalil maintained that the investigation that involved experts from France and Australia, among others, was conducted in a transparent manner.

He said every investigation has its own formula and conclusion and for the missing plane, the investigators can only arrive at a conclusion after the aircraft has been found.

Khalil was also in favour of continuing the search.

Langewiesche had resurrected the discredited theory that pilot Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah had hijacked the Boeing 777 in a murder-suicide plot and accused the Malaysian authorities from the police, air force, air traffic control, as well as the past and even present Cabinet members of a cover-up.

The writer claimed investigators and members of the aviation community believed Zaharie was under a lot of pressure but did not provide evidence to his claims.

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