Police to review reports against ex-telco boss accused of molest

Lo came out today to deny a report by a local daily that ran allegations, without naming him, claiming that he had molested his underage children. — Malay Mail file pic
Lo came out today to deny a report by a local daily that ran allegations, without naming him, claiming that he had molested his underage children. — Malay Mail file pic

KUALA LUMPUR, May 28 — Police said today they will review all 17 reports made by Jason Lo’s ex-wife and his children after the former telecommunications company CEO denied allegations he molested his children.

Explaining on behalf of Inspector General of Police Datuk Seri Abdul Hamid Bador, Bukit Aman Criminal Investigations Director Datuk Huzir Mohamed also clarified this was in addition to an incident two weeks ago, where Lo was arrested and remanded for allegedly trespassing and threatening his ex-wife and her family. 

“There a few cases that was made NFA because there was insufficient statements,” Huzir told reporters, when asked why several of Lo’s cases were classified “no further action”.

“What we are going to do is that we are going to review back all those reports and go through one by one and if there is evidence, if there is the need for us to record further statements, if we need to find more statements, we will do it.

“The latest case where he went to the house, trespassing and threatening, investigations for that one is still on,” he added.

Huzir said the cases classified as NFA were among the reports lodged from several years back, not to be confused with the incident from two weeks ago.

“That one is very clear, he went in and threatened, very clear. 

“There is evidence to charge under 506 for trespassing,” he said referring to Section 506 of the Penal Code for criminal intimidation.

Huzir explained the review process of the past cases had started last week with the Bukit Aman Sexual, Women and Child Investigations Division (D11) having gotten the scrutinising underway.

“We want to review all; yes the NFA ones also,” he added.

Former Tune Talk CEO Lo came out today to deny a report by local daily The Star that ran allegations, without naming him, claiming that he had molested his underage children.

Lo accused his ex-wife of using the paper to tarnish his reputation after an acrimonious divorce four years ago.

He said a hospital has examined his daughter, whom his ex-wife claimed was sexually abused, and found that the girl only suffered from urinary tract infection, as he shared Universiti Malaya Medical Centre’s discharge summary on Facebook.

“The Star has, most indecently and irresponsibly printed a front-page story, a ‘scoop’, or an ‘exposé’, in a vicious attempt to destroy the lives, welfare and livelihood of my family, but here is the thing — to say it was by any measure, ‘false reporting’, ‘omitting key facts’, writing ‘fiction’ or ‘bias’ etc. would be an understatement,” Lo said in a lengthy statement.

He also defended his alleged “trespass”, saying he went in only to retrieve his “kidnapped” son who was supposed to be returned after a one-night stay.

Asked if the police could verify Lo’s assertions in his Facebook post, Huzir said investigations from all angles would be carried out to obtain both sides of the story over the trespassing and threatening incident.

“That is why we are going to investigate everything; the wife’s claim, from one party and another party.

“That is why we will investigate and the deputy public prosecutor will decide to charge or not and then the court will decide,” he said.

Earlier, IGP Abdul Hamid explained that in usual circumstances, a case would be classified as NFA when there is insufficient incriminating evidence to build a strong case for a court conviction.

“When faced with this prospect, the Attorney General’s Chambers would normally classify it as NFA.

“However, PDRM are always prepared to receive or seek out more evidence, and the case would not be closed,” he said using the Malay initials for the Royal Malaysia Police.

“But if there is additional evidence that is convincing, of course, the AGC can consider charging,” he added.

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