Tate Modern shares digital tour of 'Andy Warhol' retrospective (VIDEO)

Andy Warhol’s 'Self Portrait' (1986). Tate Modern has released a virtual tour of ‘Andy Warhol’ to offer audiences the chance to step inside the gallery's blockbuster exhibition from the comfort of their own home. ― Picture courtesy of Tate Britain via AFP
Andy Warhol’s 'Self Portrait' (1986). Tate Modern has released a virtual tour of ‘Andy Warhol’ to offer audiences the chance to step inside the gallery's blockbuster exhibition from the comfort of their own home. ― Picture courtesy of Tate Britain via AFP

LONDON, April 8 ― “Andy Warhol” was on view in London when the Tate group of galleries closed their doors through at least May 1 in response to the global Covid-19 pandemic.

Tate Modern later announced that the retrospective will be on display until April 2021, giving visitors the opportunity to discover the first major show dedicated to the American Pop artist at the museum in nearly 20 years.

In the meantime, the cultural institution has released a virtual tour of “Andy Warhol” to offer audiences the chance to step inside the gallery's blockbuster exhibition from the comfort of their own home.

The film, now available on Tate's website and YouTube channel, follows curators Gregor Muir and Fiontán Moran as they share behind-the-scenes insights into the retrospective and Warhol's decades-long career.

“Andy Warhol” features over 100 works by the American Pop artist, including 20 erotic drawings from the 1950s that made their debut in the Tate Modern's blockbuster show.

Warhol tried to exhibit his artworks during the 1950s in New York City, but encountered homophobic rejection from gallery owners.

“Andy Warhol is mostly known as a Pop artist but in this exhibition, we really wanted to return to the man, and think about all the desires, the fears that may have driven him to create art. We wanted to take him out of the hype and start to look at Andy Warhol through the three lenses of the idea of the immigrant story, his queer identity and the idea of death and religion,” Muir and Moran explain in the seven-minute video. ― AFP-Relaxnews

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