KUALA LUMPUR, June 7 — Betawi is the newest addition to TTDI, offering a taste of Indonesian food with a spotlight on Betawi cuisine and select specialities from other parts of Indonesia.

It’s named after the people who inhabited Batavia (modern-day Jakarta), itself named after the Batavi, an ancient Germanic tribe that lived around the Rhine.

As the capital of the Dutch East Indies, the port city was a point of confluence of cultures.

The customs, traditions and cuisine of the Betawi were influenced by neighbouring groups like the Malays, Javanese and Sundanese as well as foreign traders including the Portuguese, Dutch and Chinese.

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The interior is more than comfortable and pleasant.
The interior is more than comfortable and pleasant.

'Tahu telor' here comes with a frizzy bit of fried crispy omelette around the tofu itself.
'Tahu telor' here comes with a frizzy bit of fried crispy omelette around the tofu itself.

The restaurant opened in late April, but there was already a steady crowd during my recent visit, with some patrons already familiar with the establishment.

The calming interior, featuring shades of brown and green, creates an atmosphere that’s perfect for dining with colleagues, especially if your boss is paying.

We started things off with a version of tahu telor (RM15), a speciality of Surabaya, East Java.

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A crispy, frilly and super light omelette encased a cube of deep-fried firm tofu, which sat in a thick, gloppy bed of bumbu kacang that was a flavourful blend of kicap manis, ground peanuts and petis udang. Simply a must-have.

'Sop buntut' here is simple and delicious, and the 'melinjo' crackers don’t disappoint.
'Sop buntut' here is simple and delicious, and the 'melinjo' crackers don’t disappoint.

'Bebek Betawi' is one of the larger format protein options here.
'Bebek Betawi' is one of the larger format protein options here.

Another appetiser was Maranggi beef satay (RM33), an iconic Sundanese variation of sate.

Fatty, tender and oozing sweet and savoury grease in each bite, these were an absolute delight to have with the sambal kecap dip, which combined chillies, tomatoes, shallots, kicap manis and soy sauce for a tangy sensation.

Sop buntut (RM30), or oxtail soup, will probably be familiar to most. This beefy soup includes morsels of gristle and fat, cubed carrots, potatoes, and tomatoes, served with slightly bitter melinjo crackers (emping) on the side. The crackers are delicious when paired with the sambal korek.

The centrepiece protein was the bebek Betawi (RM45), a generous portion of duck leg braised with a rempah blend containing hints of lemongrass, turmeric and tamarind.

It looked a little dry at first, but the duck is in fact, very tender.
It looked a little dry at first, but the duck is in fact, very tender.

The 'bubur sumsum pannacotta' doesn’t taste much like 'panna cotta', but it is undeniably delicious in its own right.
The 'bubur sumsum pannacotta' doesn’t taste much like 'panna cotta', but it is undeniably delicious in its own right.

At first glance, it appeared somewhat dry; however, it turned out to be quite tender and paired wonderfully with the green, pungent sambal. It was plenty for two to share, especially if you plan on getting rice.

For dessert, the biggest draw has to be the bubur sumsum pannacotta (RM16). Despite being likened to the classic Italian cream dessert, this was a rice pudding made with coconut milk, therefore it had a sturdier, firmer texture.

Drizzled over was a bit of palm syrup, bits of nangka, pomegranate, strawberries and tenteng, a type of candied peanut that brought an awesome bit of crunch.

Look for the pastel green sign.
Look for the pastel green sign.

Betawi Indonesian Cuisine

31, Jalan Tun Mohd Fuad 3, Taman Tun Dr Ismail, 60000 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur

Open Tuesday to Sunday, 11.30am-2.30pm, 6.30-10.30pm

Tel: 017-419 1210

Instagram: @betawi_ttdi

* This is an independent review where the writer paid for the meal.

* Follow us on Instagram @eatdrinkmm for more food gems.