Message claiming Singapore changed Covid-19 treatment protocols after autopsy on patient untrue, says ministry

A version of the message circulating on WhatsApp claimed that Singapore has become the first country in the world to perform an autopsy on a Covid-19 corpse. — WhatsApp screenshot
A version of the message circulating on WhatsApp claimed that Singapore has become the first country in the world to perform an autopsy on a Covid-19 corpse. — WhatsApp screenshot

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SINGAPORE, June 7 — A message being circulated claiming that Singapore has performed an autopsy on a Covid-19 patient, and allegedly changed treatment protocols for the disease as a result, is not true, the Ministry of Health (MOH) said today.

“Singapore has not performed such an autopsy. The message states false information concerning the pathophysiology of Covid-19 infection, which is not borne out by current evidence,” it said.

It added that an earlier version of the message, which mentioned Russia instead of Singapore, has also been exposed as untrue.

A version of the message circulating on WhatsApp, seen by TODAY, claimed that Singapore has become the first country in the world to perform an autopsy on a Covid-19 corpse.

The message read: “To find the cause of the shortage of respiratory energy, doctors in Singapore did not listen to the WHO (World Health Organization) protocol and performed an autopsy on Covid-19.

“After doctors opened arms, legs, and other parts of the body and carefully examined them, they noticed that the blood vessels were dilated and filled with blood clots, which impeded blood flow and also reduced the flow of oxygen.”

The message claimed that it was discovered that “Covid-19 does not exist as a virus, but rather a bacterium that has been exposed to radiation and causes human death by coagulation in the blood”.

MOH then purportedly “immediately changed the treatment protocol and gave aspirin to its positive patients”.

The message also claimed that “according to other Singapore scientists, ventilators and an intensive care unit were never needed”.

The message cited the “Singapore Ministry of Health” as its source.

In its statement, MOH urged the public not to spread unsubstantiated information that may cause public alarm. — TODAY

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