‘One Two Jaga’: A look at corruption in the police force

(From left) Co-executive producer Joanne Goh, producer Bront Palarae and director Namron speak with reporters at the premiere. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri
(From left) Co-executive producer Joanne Goh, producer Bront Palarae and director Namron speak with reporters at the premiere. — Picture by Ahmad Zamzahuri

PETALING JAYA, Sept 5 — Corruption in the police force is an issue not often tackled in local films as it is a “sensitive subject.”

But that is the subject of Bront Palare and Namron’s latest film One Two Jaga.

Actor Bront, who produced the film, said he went back and forth to federal police headquarters in Bukit Aman to get their approval to make the film.

“The idea behind the film came in 2014. Me and director Namron were talking about making a film and I said if we want to make a film, we should make something that matters.

“Namron then told a story that happened to someone he knew and that’s how it all got started,” Bront told Malay Mail at the film’s premiere recently.

Rosdeen (left) and Zahiril getting ready to shoot a scene. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group
Rosdeen (left) and Zahiril getting ready to shoot a scene. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group

One Two Jaga is about immigrant Sugiman (played by Indonesian actor Ario Bayu) who is trying to help his sister Sumiati (Asmara Abigail) get illegal passage on a boat back to Indonesia.

Policeman Hassan (Rosdeen Suboh), who is always short of money, takes bribes from foreign workers. His new partner, Hussein (Zahiril Adzim), is outraged when he learns about the bribes.

Ario (right) speaks to Asmara on the set of ‘One Two Jaga’. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group
Ario (right) speaks to Asmara on the set of ‘One Two Jaga’. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group

During the writing process, Namron, who also co-wrote the script, and Bront held lengthy discussions with members of the police force and the censorship board, about the film’s plot.

“It was not an easy journey. We had several meetings with them. But I am glad we took this road, and am extremely thankful the powers-that-be were open minded to allow the film to be made.

“It goes to show if you want to feature sensitive subjects in your film, you can do so. All you have to do is to meet with the relevant parties, and be more responsible in presenting your stuff,” Bront said.

Director Namron (3rd from left) speaks to the cast before shooting a scene. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group
Director Namron (3rd from left) speaks to the cast before shooting a scene. — Picture courtesy of Jazzy Group

Namron said the idea came from a conversation he had with a cleaner in his apartment building.

“Her friend did not have a work permit and had been detained. The cleaner went through great difficulties to get freedom for her friend.

“And at the same time, I read a news report about two policemen detaining three illegal immigrants. I am not pointing fingers at anyone.

“Whether we like it or not, it is something that happens every day and we need to find a way to deal with it,” Namron added.

One Two Jaga opens in cinemas tomorrow.

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