Poster emerges calling for Chinese, Indians to be expelled for rejecting hudud

Police have said they will take action against anyone who tries to spread hate against any community. — Reuters pic
Police have said they will take action against anyone who tries to spread hate against any community. — Reuters pic

KUALA LUMPUR, March 20 — A poster of a purported rally tomorrow to demand the expulsion of Malaysia’s ethnic Chinese and Indians is making the rounds on the Internet, sparking public uproar and calls for action to be taken.

But information about the event is scarce apart from its message for all Muslims in Malaysia to gather at Merdeka Square here tomorrow to make the demand of Putrajaya.

“We call on all Muslims to gather with us at Dataran Merdeka on March 21 to demand the Malaysian government expel every single Chinese and Indian from Malaysia and we also want the government to implement hudud in all states,” read the poster.

The poster purports to be from a local Malay-Muslim group, but Malay Mail Online’s attempts to contact them for clarification were unsuccessful.

Since appearing, the poster has been shared widely on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook.

Police have said they will take action against anyone who tries to spread hate against any community.

City Criminal Investigation Department chief Senior Asst Comm Zainuddin Ahmad was quoted by Star Online as saying those who try to incite hate will be detained under the Sedition Act.

“We will not tolerate anyone who tries to influence others to discriminate against any particular race or religion,” he was quoted as saying.

But Zainuddin said the police have yet to receive any indication if the rally would actually take place.

The posters surfaced just after the Kelantan state assembly yesterday approved the Shariah Criminal Code (II) (1993) 2015 Enactment with 31 votes from PAS lawmakers supported by 12 from Umno.

PAS now plans to put forward two private members’ bills in Parliament to enable Kelantan to enforce hudud ― one will seek approval for the state to legislate punishment for crimes under the Penal Code.

The other seeks to amend the Shariah Courts (Criminal) Jurisdiction Act 1965 to enable Islamic courts to mete out punishments such as the death penalty for apostasy and the amputation of limbs for theft.

The hudud issue also sparked controversy earlier today after a BFM radio presenter received death and rape threats over a programme questioning the rationale for prioritising hudud in the impoverished state of Kelantan.

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