Cradle Fund CEO murder case: Widow against insurance payout be used to pay deceased’s debts

Samirah Muzaffar, accused of murdering her husband, Cradle Fund chief executive Nazrin Hassan, attends her trial at the Shah Alam High Court October 3, 2019. — Picture by Miera Zulyana
Samirah Muzaffar, accused of murdering her husband, Cradle Fund chief executive Nazrin Hassan, attends her trial at the Shah Alam High Court October 3, 2019. — Picture by Miera Zulyana

SHAH ALAM, Dec 30 — The High Court here was told today that the first accused in the murder of Cradle Fund chief executive officer (CEO) Nazrin Hassan did not allow the deceased’s insurance payout to be used to pay his debts.

Dr Abdul Aziz Hassan, who is Nazrin’s older brother, said Samirah Muzaffar, who is the first accused and Nazrin’s widow, said the woman had instead suggested that Nazrin’s contribution in the Employees Provident Fund (EPF) be used for the purpose.

“Prior to that, I had contacted a person in Cradle Fund, by the name of Datuk Salahuddin, and asked him to assist in withdrawing a portion of Nazrin’s insurance payout to settle whatever debts still owed by Nazrin.

“However, Salahuddin later contacted me and informed that Samirah did not agree with it and instead she suggested that Nazrin’s EPF money be used to pay the debts,” he said when testifying before Judge Datuk Ab Karim Ab Rahman.

To a question by deputy public prosecutor Mohd Asnawi Abu Hanipah whether he knew the amount of Nazrin’s debts, Abdul Aziz, who is the 18th witness, said he was not sure.

“I know about the insurance coverage taken by the company for its employees, where in the event of a death, the company will get the insurance payout and the money will be paid to the next of kin of the employee concerned after getting the Board of Directors’ approval,” he added.

On Nazrin’s EPF contribution, Abdul Aziz said he found out that Samirah had entered a caveat on the money, where the withdrawal would require her permission.

Meanwhile, 19th prosecution witness, Dr Malek Reedzwan Hassan, who is also Nazrin’s older brother, said he suspected one of Samirah’s children responsible for Nazrin’s murder.

He told the court that three months prior to Nazrin’s death, his younger brother received a death threat.

“Nazrin’s personal assistant, by the name of Anis, told me about it when I met her last year. Anis also said a police report on the incident was lodged, but Nazrin withdrew the report after knowing that the threat was made by Samirah’s child, but I was not told who the child was.

“Another case was when Nazrin’s clothing were damaged by the child,” he said, adding that he believed the two incidents were linked to Nazrin’s murder.

Questioned by Samirah” lawyer, Tan Sri Muhammad Shafee Abdullah, whether he informed the police on the information obtained from Anis, Dr Malek Reedzwan said he did not.

On March 12, Samirah, 44, who is a former senior executive at the Intellectual Property Corporation of Malaysia (MyIPO), and two teenagers aged 17 and 14, were charged, along with Indonesian citizen, Eka Wahyu Lestari, who is still at large, with Nazrin’s murder.

They are alleged to have committed the offence at a house in Mutiara Homes, Mutiara Damansara, between 11.30pm on June 13, 2018, and 4am on June 14, 2018.

They are charged under Section 302 of the Penal Code, read together with Section 34 of the same law, and face the mandatory death sentence if found guilty.

The hearing continues on February 14. — Bernama

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