Syed Saddiq comes to deputy’s defence after PAS’ ‘Christianisation’ claim

Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during an interview in Putrajaya April 23, 2019. — Picture by Mukhriz Hazim
Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman speaks during an interview in Putrajaya April 23, 2019. — Picture by Mukhriz Hazim

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 18 — Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Abdul Rahman defended his deputy Steven Sim after the latter was accused by PAS deputy president Datuk Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man of pursuing a “Christianisation” agenda.

The minister said he never got the impression that Sim sought to convert him or other staff of the ministry, saying he believes the latter to be a believer of diversity and moderation.

“Stop the politics of hate and let us build more bridges together as a united Malaysia,” Syed Saddiq said on Twitter

 

 

Earlier today, Tuan Ibrahim warned DAP and its fellow Pakatan Harapan components in a statement not to use scare tactic against the newly-forged Umno-PAS union, and claimed DAP was engaging in a Christianisation agenda of the country.

He specifically singled out Sim for giving a speech at the “Naratif Malaysia Baru” forum in the Mega Chinese Methodist Church at Kota Damansara last Saturday.

Tuan Ibrahim alleged that Sim’s speech on the Christian concept of Kingdom of God and the “Jesus Manifesto”’ was tantamount to promoting such an agenda.

The phrase Kingdom of God, or Kingdom of Heaven, occurs frequently in the New Testament, primarily attributed to Jesus Christ in the first three Gospels.

In response, Sim urged the PAS deputy president to respect religious freedom in the country, adding that he merely highlighted Biblical values to his audience as a reminder for them to become good Malaysians.

The Council of Churches Malaysia also condemned Tuan Ibrahim’s remarks, saying the forum was part of the church’s Malaysia Day observance to assist its members to contribute to nation building by participating in a shared narrative.

Malay-Muslim conservative groups here have consistently spoken out against Christianisation, human rights, and religious pluralism as alleged threats against the Malay-Muslim community in recent years.

Related Articles