Poisoning strays is illegal, SPCA says after cat killings

File picture shows a passenger playing with cats, in a train cat cafe, held on a local train to bring awareness to the culling of stray cats in Ogaki, Japan. — Reuters pic
File picture shows a passenger playing with cats, in a train cat cafe, held on a local train to bring awareness to the culling of stray cats in Ogaki, Japan. — Reuters pic

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KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 8 — The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) Selangor encouraged the public today to use more humane ways of controlling stray animal populations after a spate of cat killings.

SPCA Selangor inspectorate Kelvin Cheah said they have received four reports in the same week of cat colonies dying in four separate areas, including Wangsa Maju, Taman Melawati, USJ, and Kuala Lumpur.

“Under the Animal Welfare Act 2015, poisoning animals is punishable by a fine of RM25,000 to RM100,000, three years imprisonment, or both,” he told Malay Mail.

A recent spate of cat killings occurred recently, with the latest being at the Seri Kenangan Condominium in Wangsa Maju where up to 19 cats have been found poisoned over the past few months.

Cheah said stray animals are a part of society for the time being and tolerance is key in keeping people from all walks of life, animal lovers or otherwise, living together harmoniously.

“Many other countries have chosen to share space with the animals around them, including Turkey and Nepal. It is through humane effort in assisting animals that they can live their remaining lives on the street with dignity, through programmes like our Stray Free Selangor (SFS),” he said.

Counting Tengku Permaisuri Selangor Tengku Permaisuri Norashikin Abd Rahman as its royal patron, SFS promotes effective and sustainable ways to curb stray populations through several initiatives including educating residential communities on humane methods, collaborating with municipal councils and other NGOs in achieving high-volume spaying/neutering, as well as government lobbying.

“Stray animals are a long-term issue that requires long-term solutions. There are no quick fixes for it, otherwise it would have been solved long before,” Cheah said, adding he also had several advisory points for pet owners and rescuers.

“Please keep your animals indoors and do not let them pick up anything suspicious on the streets. If you think they may have accidentally ingested poisonous bait, send them to a vet immediately,” he said.

For cases of suspected poisoning or animal abuse, the public can inform the Department of Veterinary Services via email at [email protected] or WhatsApp them at +6019 224 2233 with their details, contact references, and a brief description of the incident with date and timeline.

Alternately they can also file a online report with SPCA Selangor at its website here.

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