After threats to BFM presenter, father asks what has become of Malaysia

A screenshot of the ‘Hudud Isi Periuk Nasi? [Kupas]’ video posted on YouTube.
A screenshot of the ‘Hudud Isi Periuk Nasi? [Kupas]’ video posted on YouTube.

KUALA LUMPUR, March 20 — The father of a radio presenter who was harassed over a video critical of hudud today asked if Malaysia remained a safe place to reside if simply expressing opposing views attracted such threats as rape and even death.

Noting that most of the threats appeared to originate from Malays, Professor Dr Mohamad Tajuddin Mohamad Rasdi asked how such a culture of hostility came to exist, questioning if it is rooted in the flaws of the country’s leadership or education.

“Is this country safe for our children to live in? If a simple point of view is raised against such an issue as hudud or even such an issue as democracy and clean elections can produce outbursts of murder, rape and burning people alive, what does it say about our country, its citizens and our leadership? Where did this culture come from?” Mohamad Tajudin said in letter published by news portal The Malaysian Insider.

“I have noticed that the ones making threats of this nature come from mostly Malays who I assume are Muslim. Where did we, as a nation go wrong in educating these Malays? What are we teaching in our secondary schools? More importantly are our public universities producing people of such culture?”

He expressed hope that none of those who issued the threats were products of Malaysia’s public universities, else they reflected poorly on vice-chancellors of such institutions.

“Yes, they are passable engineers and architects but are they barely passable Malaysian citizens, or passable Muslims or worse are they even passable human beings with a humane conscience? ‘Apa sudah jadi?’” he added.

Despite his anger over the incident Mohamad Tajudin said he was prepared to forgive Aisyah’s detractors, claiming that it was the society that created those blinded by rage.

Aisyah received the threats on various online platforms after a video titled “Hudud Isi Periuk Nasi? [Kupas] (Does hudud fill our rice bowls?)” was uploaded on the business radio station’s website and YouTube channel yesterday.

In it, she points out that even as Kelantan is attempting to implement hudud, the east coast state is facing other problems like its homeless flood victims, as well as increasing drug and divorce cases.

Users also urged the authorities to take action against Aisyah, accusing her of insulting Islam.

BFM later removed the video and apologised for any offence caused.

Kelantan, administered by Islamist party PAS, passed amendments to the Shariah Criminal Code II 1993 yesterday in a bid to enforce hudud law in the state ― despite fierce opposition from its Pakatan Rakyat (PR) allies, the DAP and PKR.

PAS is expected to table private members’ bills in Parliament to remove legal roadblocks in the implementation of the Islamic penal code that punishes apostasy with the death penalty and theft with the amputation of limbs.