Artificial intelligence spotted on everything (and anything!) at CES 2021

Thanks to its new processor, the Panasonic JZ2000 can analyse the picture every second and automatically adjust picture quality. — Picture courtesy of Panasonic
Thanks to its new processor, the Panasonic JZ2000 can analyse the picture every second and automatically adjust picture quality. — Picture courtesy of Panasonic

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LAS VEGAS, Jan 16 — If there’s one thing to take away from the 2021 edition of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), it’s that artificial intelligence (AI) seemed to be omnipresent in the technologies and devices presented.

Whether a marketing argument or genuine technological progress, AI has become an inevitable part of many new applications, TVs and vehicle dashboards — not to mention toothbrushes and massage chairs!

Smart TVs

TVs have been the major stars of CES for a few years now, and this edition — held entirely online due to the covid-19 pandemic — was no exception.

Thanks to new, ultra-high-performance processors, manufacturers are promising optimal image quality thanks to built-in artificial intelligence.

Sony, for example, unveiled a new range of TVs capable of anticipating which part of the screen viewers are likely to be looking at, in order to systematically bring out the best in this “focal point” of the image.

Similarly, Panasonic showcased a new TV model that automatically calibrates the image in relation to the kind of content displayed (movie, sport, concert, video game, etc.).

Samsung and LG also embraced artificial intelligence, whether for upscaling (converting HD content to 4K resolution onscreen, for example) or for recommending shows for viewers to watch.

Smart objects

As well as TVs, almost all the connected devices presented at CES seemed to boast some kind of artificial “intelligence,” which, in reality, is often an ability to record and convey user habits.

That, for example, is seen in products as diverse as a toothbrush, which sends brushing quality reports to your smartphone, or in a massage chair, which can adapt its technique to user needs expressed by voice command.

In-car AI

Finally, cars were also on the agenda at CES, in particular with cabin technology that’s ever more spectacular and connected.

Here too, artificial intelligence has a role to play, coming to life onscreen with custom suggestions, or via driving comfort systems, not to mention entertainment for both driver and passengers.

Mercedes and BMW, for example, presented future touchscreen interfaces with integrated AI. — AFP-Relaxnews

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