Malaysia to use reformed militants to steer youths from IS

Zahid noted that in Malaysia as well as other countries, the IS influence is said to be strongest in universities. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
Zahid noted that in Malaysia as well as other countries, the IS influence is said to be strongest in universities. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, July 6 — Former militants who underwent successful rehabilitation will be enlisted to help Malaysia stop the spread of terrorism by advising local university students against joining the terror group Islamic State (IS).

Home Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi, who is also deputy prime minister, noted that in Malaysia as well as other countries, the IS influence is said to be strongest in universities.

"As for those who have been deradicalised, we will have them appear not only in the media, we will also have them at several institutes of higher learning, because we know that the strongest influence is feared to be at institutes of higher learning," he told reporters here.

"We will also continue to monitor several actions, especially if they have communication whether through social media or other communication systems, so it doesn't spread widely in our country," he added.

Zahid said the government will seek the help of reformed individuals formerly detained under the Internal Security Act and the Security Offences (Special Measures) Act to counter the IS threat.

"We will ask those formerly detained over the offence of being involved in militant and JI groups and those trained under the deradicalisation system to work together with the authorities to appear in the media to give awareness to the public and also those who may be influenced by IS sentiments, to not join in the activities," he said, referring to terrorist network Jemaah Islamiyah.

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