Car convoys still allowed but strict rules apply, traffic cops warn after Duke crash

Bukit Aman Traffic Police chief Datuk Mohd Fuad Abdul Latiff said there is a specific set of rules and regulations for motor vehicle convoys. — Picture by Choo Choy May
Bukit Aman Traffic Police chief Datuk Mohd Fuad Abdul Latiff said there is a specific set of rules and regulations for motor vehicle convoys. — Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, May 4 — Police will not ban vehicle convoys following last week’s crash on the Duta-Ulu Klang Expressway (Duke), Bukit Aman’s traffic division confirmed, but issued a strict reminder for auto enthusiasts to adhere to road rules when participating in the activity.

Bukit Aman Traffic Police chief Datuk Mohd Fuad Abdul Latiff said there is a specific set of rules and regulations for motor vehicle convoys that must be observed in order to ensure the lives of other motorists are not put at risk.

“No problem or ban on convoys, but they must obey traffic rules set for such activities,” he told Malay Mail Online when contacted.

He explained that the rules vary according to the number of vehicles participating in the convoy as well as the road condition.

Only large convoys require organisers to write in to the police for permits, he said, without commenting on impromptu convoys commonly seen among car club gatherings.

“Of course, we advise them to not go in a big group in convoys as they pose a danger to others.

“Long lines of cars and motorcycles are dangerous and if the front person makes an abrupt stop or mistake, those following behind are going to be in trouble. The probability of a crash is very high.

“If the road is a winding one with many junctions, then it is not advisable for a huge convoy. But if it’s a highway, then about 10 to 20 cars can go in one convoy,” he added.

When asked if the police plan on tightening rules and penalties for car and motorcycle clubs that violate road rules while in a convoy, Mohd Fuad said the authorities may look into doing so soon, but declined to comment further.

“We don’t single out certain groups. If we do our operations, it’s going to be an overall exercise including motorcycle (clubs),” he added.

Fairuz Nizam Husain, 35, his wife Nova Safitri Azhari, 27, and their infant daughter Nur Firuza Annisa were killed after their Pajero crashed with two Myvis on Duke during the pre-dawn hours on Saturday.

The couple left behind two girls aged seven and four.

It is believed that the two Myvis were part of a group of six cars of the same make allegedly involved in an illegal race when the accident happened.

Police have since released on bail the drivers of the two Myvis that crashed into the Pajero — including the 35-year-old female suspect — apart from calling 11 people, including witnesses, for questioning.

According to an eyewitness interviewed in an article today by Malay daily Sinar Harian, three groups of Myvis were seen being driven fast and aggressively prior to the crash.

Describing the incidents leading up to the fatal accident, 18-year-old Muhammad Zaki Abdullah claimed that one of the cars even tailgated his car in the middle lane before overtaking him on the right, just seconds before the accident happened.

The case is being probed under Section 41(1) of the Road Transport Act 1987 and eyewitnesses were requested to contact the nearest police station to facilitate the investigation.

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