Two months after recovery, CNN anchor Richard Quest still has Covid-19 symptoms, possible neurological damage (VIDEO)

Quest says he has days when he feels like the virus has returned to his body despite reassurances from his doctors. — Screengrab from Twitter/cnni
Quest says he has days when he feels like the virus has returned to his body despite reassurances from his doctors. — Screengrab from Twitter/cnni

PETALING JAYA, July 8 — CNN anchor Richard Quest has revealed that he still suffers from the hallmark symptoms of Covid-19 despite being told by doctors that he has recovered.

In an article for CNN Health, the British-born presenter said he still has a raspy, wheezy cough that comes and goes along with feelings of fatigue.

He was diagnosed with Covid-19 in mid-April in New York but is now realising that the illness may have long-term effects that medical professionals are still trying to comprehend.

“The virus is like a tornado. When it lands, it swirls through the body, causing chaos, confusion, coughs, wreaking damage to each organ it touches.

“Some won't survive its visit. For those that do, when it has gone, one surveys the damage to the human landscape and realises it's much greater than first thought.

“Like many others, I am now coming to realize that I am living and suffering from the long tail of Covid-19,” Quest wrote.

 

Despite testing negative for Covid-19 and positive for the antibodies, Quest said he has days where he feels like he is going through a second bout of the virus.

Quest's doctor reassured him that there is no solid evidence indicating that reinfection is possible and told the news anchor that his symptoms will wear off, but could not say when.

To make things worse, Quest said he is “discovering new areas of damage” in his body including extreme clumsiness, a possible sign of neurological damage believed to be induced by the virus.

Quest added that he has also experienced digestive problems and appetite changes following his infection.

“I was never the most lissome person, no one ever called me graceful, but my clumsiness is off the chart.

“If I reach for a glass, or take something out of a cupboard, I will knock it, or drop it on the floor. I have tripped over the curb and gone flying. I fall over furniture.

“It is as if that part of my brain, which subconsciously adjusts hand and movement to obstacles it sees, isn't working,” he said.

There are over three million confirmed Covid-19 cases and 133,000 deaths caused by the virus in the United States where Quest resides and he urged people to “do whatever (they) can to avoid this tornado.”

“(The virus) will roar through the body — kill some on the way — injure all in its path — and then when you think ‘well, thank God that's gone,’ look around, the damage is strewn everywhere and will be with you long after the crisis has passed.

“Covid is a tornado with a very long tail.”

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