Kebun-Kebun Bangsar community garden instructed to vacate land with immediate effect

The community garden which donates its produce to soup kitchens and orphanages received an eviction notice yesterday. — Picture from Facebook/Kebun-Kebun Bangsar
The community garden which donates its produce to soup kitchens and orphanages received an eviction notice yesterday. — Picture from Facebook/Kebun-Kebun Bangsar

PETALING JAYA, March 13 — The Kebun-Kebun Bangsar community garden at Lorong Bukit Pantai was slapped with an eviction notice yesterday and was asked to vacate the land with immediate effect.

The news was announced on the community farm’s social media platforms yesterday afternoon.

“Sorry folks, we just might have to shut down,” Kebun-Kebun Bangsar wrote on Facebook.

A snapshot of the red notice issued by the Department of Director General of Lands and Mines (JKPTG) Federal Territories dated March 12 was also shared.

 

 

According to the notice, Kebun-Kebun Bangsar committed an offence under Section 425 (1) of the National Land Code and was informed to tear down all structures to vacate the land owned by Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB).

The authorities also told the farm owners that they may face a penalty not exceeding RM500,000 or a jail term of five years if the notice is ignored.

This comes as a heavy blow after the community farm received a final notice dated February 25 from the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) to remove all its domestic animals.

Kebun-Kebun Bangsar co-founder Ng Sek San claimed the animals they reared became an issue when a resident in the area made a complaint.

Comments from the public following the news of the farm’s looming closure. — Picture from Facebook/Kebun-Kebun Bangsar
Comments from the public following the news of the farm’s looming closure. — Picture from Facebook/Kebun-Kebun Bangsar

In a heartfelt post by Ng this afternoon, the famed architect wrote about the important role that the farm’s cows, lamb, chicken, ducks and geese played in educating the public about the symbiotic relationship between animals and nature.

In addition, they also provided emotional support to children.

“The few animals on our large tract of land (eight acres) are an integral part of the urban farm.

“Thousands of children visit the animals, and some of them especially special needs kids are very attached to them.

“We cannot self-censor just to please others and authorities — KKB needs to do the right thing just as the authorities have the right to throw us out,” Ng said, using the acronym for the community farming space he set up around five years ago.

Kebun-Kebun Bangsar and Ng also shared a letter from TNB addressed to DBKL dated January 23 explaining although approval was granted on July 26, 2016 to run the community farm, it was subject to terms and conditions.

TNB said it never approved the rearing of domestic animals such as cows, ducks and rabbits and that the activity did not sit well with some residents, urging DBKL to take necessary action.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Kebun-Kebun Bangsar (@kebunkebunbangsar) on

 

The announcement of the farm’s looming closure prompted a barrage of comments on Facebook with many stressing the importance of such green spaces in the city.

The community farm which is open every day including public holidays is run by volunteers and grows a multitude of vegetables, fruits, flowers and even has a rice field.

Kebun-Kebun Bangsar doesn’t sell its produce but donates harvests to soup kitchens and orphanages.

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