MASkargo operates first cargo-in-cabin flight from Shanghai to Melbourne

The CIC90 is the code given to MASkargo’s passenger-to-cargo (P2C) flight which carries cargo on seats in addition to the overhead stowage compartments, closets and under the seats depending on the size of the boxes. — Reuters pic
The CIC90 is the code given to MASkargo’s passenger-to-cargo (P2C) flight which carries cargo on seats in addition to the overhead stowage compartments, closets and under the seats depending on the size of the boxes. — Reuters pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 12 — MAB Kargo Sdn Bhd yesterday accomplished its first Cargo-in-Cabin 90 (CIC90) operation from Pudong, China to Melbourne, Australia.

The CIC90 is the code given to MASkargo’s passenger-to-cargo (P2C) flight which carries cargo on seats in addition to the overhead stowage compartments, closets and under the seats depending on the size of the boxes.

Previously, MASkargo only had approval for CIC that allows cargo under seats, in the closets and overhead compartments for its P2C flights.

The Malaysia Aviation Group’s MABKargo, Airport Operations, Aero Darat Services, Corporate Safety, Engineering Technical Services, AMAL and Flight Operations team jointly developed procedures which were subsequently approved by the Civil Aviation Authorities of Malaysia.

“We successfully operated our first CIC flight on May 14, 2020 via MH149 from Kuala Lumpur to Melbourne,” said freighter operations senior manager Che Adenan Che Wan in a statement today.

He said Flight MH 387, utilising Malaysia Airlines’ Airbus 330-300 passenger aircraft left Shanghai Pudong International Airport at 0150LT and arrived at Kuala Lumpur International Airport at 0720LT for refuelling and crew change before taking off for Melbourne at 1010LT.

The flight from China carried approximately 5,000 boxes of sterile isolation gowns for healthcare workers in Melbourne.

Of the 5,000 boxes, about 200 were strapped on the seats while 215 were stowed in the overheard compartments. The rest of the boxes were carried in the belly of the aircraft. — Bernama

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