After Go-Jek, youth minister meets boss of banned Dego Ride bike-hailing firm

Dego Ride was declared illegal by the Najib administration in 2017 due to road safety concerns. — Picture via Facebook
Dego Ride was declared illegal by the Najib administration in 2017 due to road safety concerns. — Picture via Facebook

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 28 — Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman has met up with the boss of homegrown motorcycle taxi service Dego Ride, which was banned in 2017 by the previous government under Barisan Nasional.

The youth and sports minister tweeted a photo of himself with Dego Ride founder Nabil Feisal Bamadha at his ministry office yesterday.

“With the founder of #Degoride, brother Nabil. Before they were banned by the previous government, Dego successfully hired 1,500 mat motor (motorcycle riders). Salary RM1,500-RM3,500.

“(About) 85% of the mat motors hired were youths. Within three months of operating, they have attracted more than 60,000 users,” the caption reads.

 

 

Dego Ride pioneered the motorcycle taxi service model in Malaysia in late 2016, and was subsequently declared illegal by the Najib administration in 2017 due to road safety concerns.

On August 24, Syed Saddiq said the Pakatan Harapan government will also assist to push Dego Ride, after meeting the boss of Indonesian firm Go-Jek and getting the Cabinet to agree “in principle” to restart the bike-hailing service.

Syed Saddiq previously remarked that ride-hailing service could aid the last-mile dilemma for commuters.

The highly-popular Go-Jek ride hailing company founded by Nadiem Makarim in 2010 is also running in Thailand and Vietnam under the names GET and Go-Viet respectively.

Transport Minister Anthony Loke Loke has said the motorcycle ride-hailing service is seen to complement the land public transport system, and stressed the service would not replace other land public transport services.

He also said the Transport Ministry has been given a month to submit a report on the direction and mechanism for motorcycle ride-hailing services to the Cabinet, after the Cabinet in principle agreed to the proposed service.

To date, motorcycle e-hailing exists in nearly a dozen countries ranging from Brazil, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Indonesia, India, Mexico, Nigeria, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

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