Ministry open to discussion on chemical castration

Indonesia’s Widodo introduced a series of tough punishments for child sex offenders in May through an emergency decree, including chemical castration, following an outcry over the fatal gang-rape of a schoolgirl. — Reuters pic
Indonesia’s Widodo introduced a series of tough punishments for child sex offenders in May through an emergency decree, including chemical castration, following an outcry over the fatal gang-rape of a schoolgirl. — Reuters pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 21 — The Women, Family and Community Development Ministry is open to a suggestion to consider following Indonesia’s footsteps in introducing chemical castration for paedophiles.

Shamsul Iskandar Md Akin (PKR-Bukit Katil) had made the suggestion to follow Indonesian President Joko Widodo’s move during the question-and-answer session yesterday.

Replying, Deputy Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Azizah Mohd Dun said: “I am confident that Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Azalina Othman and the rest in the taskforce are having an in-depth discussion on the terms and guidelines that they are going to use to reach a consensus on how to deal with paedophiles.

“Whether this is one of the terms, I don’t know, and if it is something that is agreed on, then Parliament can consider.”

Earlier this month, Azalina, who chairs the taskforce on sexual crimes against children, said the Child Sexual Crime Bill was ready to be presented to Parliament in its current meeting.

If passed, the bill would be an extension to the Child Act (Amendment) 2016 and the Penal Code.

Widodo introduced a series of tough punishments for child sex offenders in May through an emergency decree, including chemical castration and the death penalty, following an outcry over the fatal gang-rape of a schoolgirl.

He said chemical castration would be able to reduce sex crimes and wipe them out over time.

Chemical castration involves using drugs to reduce libido and sex drive.