KUCHING, Feb 12 — Ipoi Datan will delve into the intriguing world of saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus) and their profound impact on traditional cultures in Sarawak, Borneo, and beyond, in an upcoming museum talk titled “Crocodiles: Myths, Superstitions and Realities” this weekend.

The museum talk, scheduled for February 18 at the Borneo Cultures Museum Auditorium, promises to be a captivating exploration of the intertwined relationship between crocodiles and indigenous belief systems.

Ipoi, a Lun Bawang native from Lawas and a distinguished scholar with a PhD in Etho-Archaeology from the University of Science Malaysia, Penang, brings decades of expertise to his exploration of crocodile symbolism.

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The talk is scheduled for February 18 at the Borneo Cultures Museum Auditorium.
The talk is scheduled for February 18 at the Borneo Cultures Museum Auditorium.

Drawing from his extensive experience as an archaeologist at the Sarawak Museum and his current role as a Research Officer at the Majlis Adat Istiadat Sarawak (Council for Traditions and Customs Sarawak), he is uniquely positioned to shed light on the multifaceted significance of crocodiles in indigenous communities.

Throughout his career, Ipoi has been deeply involved in preserving and promoting Sarawak’s cultural heritage and served as the Archaeologist at the Sarawak Museum from 1982, later becoming the Deputy Director from 1998 to 2008, and subsequently the Director from 2009 to 2018.

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Currently, he continues to contribute his expertise as an advisory panel member for Universiti Malaysia Sarawak and as an Expert for Archaeology for Icomos Missions.

Attendees will have the opportunity to gain insight into the origins of crocodile myths and superstitions among communities such as the Iban, Lun Bawang, and Malay, and their enduring relevance in modern society.

Those who wish to register to participate can register online by clicking

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScS_NPEE36WLxftzfjd-eYVxvgLQuckEdJ8J4VTWJausJloKw/viewform and fill in the form. — Borneo Post