Prosecution wants joint hearing of Rizal’s corruption and Rosmah’s money laundering cases

High Court judge Mohamed Zaini has set April 24 for mention to know the status of the cases involving Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor (pic) and Rizal Mansor. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
High Court judge Mohamed Zaini has set April 24 for mention to know the status of the cases involving Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor (pic) and Rizal Mansor. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, March 21 — The prosecution has filed an application for a joint hearing of the corruption and money laundering cases facing Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor, who is former Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s wife, and the corruption case involving Najib’s former special officer, Datuk Rizal Mansor.

Former Federal Court judge Datuk Seri Gopal Sri Ram, who has been appointed senior deputy public prosecutor, informed High Court judge Mohamed Zaini Mazlan when the matter came up for mention today.

Mohamed Zaini then set April 24 for mention to know the status of the cases involving Rosmah, 67, and Rizal, 45.

Lawyer Datuk Geethan Ram Vincent, representing Rosmah, told reporters after the proceeding that today was fixed to hear the application for the joint hearing (of the corruption and money laundering cases).

“But, it cannot be conducted because only the case on money laundering was registered before judge Mohamed Zain, and also Rosmah’s failure to declare her income to the Inland Revenue Board.

“The status of the corruption case on the supply and installation of solar energy to rural schools in Sarawak involving Rosmah is still unknown,” he said.

On October 4 2018, Rosmah, who is also represented by lawyers Manjeet Singh Dhillon and Datuk K. Kumaraendran, pleaded not guilty in the Sessions Court here to 12 counts of money laundering, involving RM7,097,750, and five counts for failing to declare her income to the Inland revenue Board.

The offences were allegedly committed at Affin Bank Berhad, Bangunan Getah Asli branch, ground Floor, 148 Jalan Ampang here between December 4, 2013 and June 8, 2017 and the Inland Revenue Board, Kompleks Bangunan Kerajaan , Jalan Tuanku Abdul Halim here between May 1, 2014 and May 1, 2018.

The charges on money laundering were framed under Section 4(1) (a) of the Anti-Money Laundering, Anti-Terrorism Financing and Proceeds of Unlawful Activities Act 2001 and punishable under Section 4(1) of the same law, which provides an imprisonment for up to 15 years and fine of not less than five times the sum or value of the proceeds of unlawful activity or RM5 million, whichever is higher, if found guilty.

The charges for tax evasion were made under Section 77(1) of the Income Tax Act 1967 required her to furnish returns of her income for the assessment year 2013 to 2017 to the IRB Director-General on or before April 30, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 without reasonable excuse contrary to Section 112 of the law.

On the case involving the supply and installation of solar energy to rural schools in Sarawak, Rosmah was charged on two counts of soliciting RM187.5 million and receiving RM1.5 million two years ago for the projects.

The charges were made under Section 16(a) (A) of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Act (MACC), and faces imprisonment for up to 20 years and a fine of not less than five times the amount of the gratification of RM10,000, whichever is higher, upon conviction.

Rizal, represented by lawyer Ridha Abdah Subri, pleaded not guilty to four counts of soliciting and accepting bribes for himself and Rosmah, amounting to RM5.5 million, involving the supply of equipment and installation of the solar hybrid system for rural schools in Sarawak. 

The charges were framed under Section 16(a) (A) of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Act (MACC), which provides imprisonment for up to 20 years and a fine of not less than five times the amount of the gratification of RM10,000, whichever is higher, upon conviction. — Bernama