Auto industry workshop shake-up planned

The NAP will implement better workshop operations through the proposed 4Ms concept. — Picture by Malay Mail
The NAP will implement better workshop operations through the proposed 4Ms concept. — Picture by Malay Mail

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 3 — Consumers are expected to breathe a sigh of relief when the National Automotive Policy 2014 (NAP) comes into force beginning this year.

Lawmakers have proposed reforms that are hoped to drastically improve services in the motoring industry. 

The Malaysian Automotive Institute (MAI) said the new policy has proposed initiatives that would give consumers greater benefits including cost transparency, enhanced level of repair quality, services with proper procedures and qualified mechanics, spare parts standardisation, and insurance coverage, among others. 

In an exclusive Malay Mail interview, MAI aftersales development head Cho Chee Seng said the policy was drawn up by the institute in close cooperation with the International Trade and Industry Ministry and industry stakeholders. It aims to address long-standing issues that would enable the aftermarket services sector to regain consumer trust. 

The measures and guidelines are expected to be implemented over the next five years.

“Consumers need to feel comfortable and safe when they go to a workshop. 

“Some enter the workshop and are immediately worried or afraid. Many have a negative perception of the aftermarket industry because of some black sheep,” he said. 

“To deal with these issues, we propose measures to improve the system.” 

The NAP will implement better workshop operations through the proposed 4Ms concept: man, method, material and machine. 

The concept will introduce properly-trained technicians and appropriate methods of repairs, using the right tools and equipment. 

“Technicians must be trained to perform according to prescribed work procedures. 

“The MAI has been appointed by the Human Resources Ministry’s Skills Development Department to spearhead various human capacity building programmes to train and develop entry level and existing technicians in the manufacturing and aftermarket sectors. 

“This will provide qualified and trained technicians to support better and efficient services to Malaysian motorists,” said Cho. 

He said MAI is pursuing the implementation of the “Universal Workshop Management System”, software components that will ensure the use of clear, concise transactional documents in the workshop. 

“This will prevent cases of delayed repairs or even overcharging. 

“Workshops will need to state the exact costs involved in the repairs, as well as the time of delivery of parts. 

“The components of the system will enhance the current transactional document requirements as stipulated under the Workshop Information Disclosure Requirements regulation, which falls under the Consumer Protection Act,” said Cho.

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