Amanah rubbishes rumours of no-confidence vote against PM

Mat Sabu accused the Opposition of spreading the rumours to distract from the criminal trials of some party leaders and ongoing investigations into others, which he said caused their members to lose faith. — Picture by Azinuddin Ghazali
Mat Sabu accused the Opposition of spreading the rumours to distract from the criminal trials of some party leaders and ongoing investigations into others, which he said caused their members to lose faith. — Picture by Azinuddin Ghazali

KUALA LUMPUR, Feb 20 — Claims Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad will be put through a motion of no-confidence are entirely fabricated, said Parti Amanah Negara chief Mohamad Sabu.

The defence minister commonly called Mat Sabu accused the Opposition of spreading the rumours to distract from the criminal trials of some party leaders and ongoing investigations into others, which he said caused their members to lose faith.

He further asserted the rumours were part of a larger effort to destabilise the Pakatan Harapan (PH) government and to draw it away from efforts to prosper the country.

“It must be stressed here that there is no question at all of a no-confidence vote against Tun (Dr Mahathir).

“Amanah and other Pakatan Harapan components have always been firmly behind Tun in efforts to completely reform and enhance the country’s administration,” he said in a statement.

Mat Sabu then urged Amanah grassroots to return their focus on building up the party’s ranks and to support PH’s bid to retain the Semenyih seat in Selangor next month.

Opposition party PAS previously alleged that two PH components were conspiring to introduce a motion of no-confidence against Prime Minister Dr Mahathir, but did not provide evidence of the assertion.

Prior to Mat Sabu today, PKR president Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim and DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng already rejected the claim as false and slanderous.

In democracies, a vote of no-confidence is called for lawmakers to demonstrate that the head of the government no longer commands the support of the majority he needs to govern. In Malaysia, this requires a simple majority of 112 votes from the 222-seat Parliament.

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