Deputy IGP: No room in police force for those without integrity

Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor speaks at the closing ceremony of a three-day seminar in Kuala Lumpur, November 1, 2019. ― Picture by Choo Choy May
Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor speaks at the closing ceremony of a three-day seminar in Kuala Lumpur, November 1, 2019. ― Picture by Choo Choy May

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 1 — The Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) will not tolerate officers lacking integrity and trustworthiness, Deputy Inspector-General of Police Datuk Mazlan Mansor said in a severe warning today.

Speaking at the closing ceremony of a three-day seminar for around 156 district police chiefs from around the country, Mazlan said the law enforcement agency would not hesitate to replace those found wanting.

He stressed that a culture of integrity must be instilled in the force, with district chiefs taking the lead and setting an example for their subordinates.

Mazlan conceded that pockets of indiscipline and crime remained in the force, before warning them that there were plenty who were eager and waiting to take their places.

“We found out that from our intake, there are a lot of people who want to join the force as there were 6,000 vacancies with around 37,000 people applicants.

“If one leaves the force there are many who can replace them.

“That is why I hope officers and those within PDRM will understand the primary goals of the force,” he said.

Mazlan explained to the press that the seminar stressed the importance of good governance among  district police chiefs as they were seen as representatives of the force.

Other topics addressed during the seminar included community engagement, service delivery, and the agency’s reputation.

He said officers were reminded that the PDRM was still dimly viewed by sections of society, with efforts necessary to correct this.

“It is pointless if we boast of our successes of crime fighting one after another but still fail at winning the hearts of the society through quality service delivery.

“I believe a large number of those within society still have a poor understanding of how the police work, especially from the aspect of investigations and case development.

“So we stressed that there has to be engagement with society and those within the community who require help, that we respond to them, and don’t stay silent; this is a condition that we need to remedy among our officers,” he said.

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