Pota, Poca balances human rights with national security, says Nancy Shukri

Nancy Shukri said provisions under the POTA and POCA which were debated was detention without trial which was said to be a revival of the Internal Security Act (ISA), when in fact, they were completely different. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
Nancy Shukri said provisions under the POTA and POCA which were debated was detention without trial which was said to be a revival of the Internal Security Act (ISA), when in fact, they were completely different. ― Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

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KUCHING, Sept 4 — The Prevention of Terrorism Act (Pota) 2015 and the Prevention of Crime Act (Poca) 2013 contain elements which balance human rights with national security, says Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department, Nancy Shukri.

She said provisions under the Pota and Poca which were debated was detention without trial which was said to be a revival of the Internal Security Act (ISA), when in fact, they were completely different.

She said if previously, the ISA was said to have been abused under the executive powers of the minister, Pota and Poca had made provisions for the Crime Prevention Board whose members were appointed by the Yang DiPertuan Agong. 

“It must be reminded that the law against terrorism which was passed by Parliament does not intend to infringe upon the rights of the people but is aimed at protecting the security of the people and nation. 

“Pota and Poca are the legal provisions which curb the involvement of Malaysians with terrorists who have deviated from the actual struggles,” added Nancy.

The minister said this in her keynote address at the Seminar on Sustainability of National Security on the topic, ‘National Security A Joint Responsibility’, organised by the National Institute of Public Administration (INTAN), in collaboration with the National Security Council and the Malaysian Islamic Development Department (Jakim).

Meanwhile, Nancy said relatively, the national security forces could still curb terrorism activities in the country although statistics showed an increase in the number of Malaysians participating in overseas militant activities. 

“From 2001 to October 2014, a total of 167 people were involved in militant activities internationally. As of April 7, this number is reported to have increased to 173,” she noted.

She said no country could give a 100 per cent assurance that it was free from terrorism, but the authorities here were committed to monitoring, and gathering evidence and intelligence (on terrorist activities). — Bernama

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