In Johor, cops say solved 87 out of 143 missing persons cases

Johor police chief Datuk Mohd Khalil Kader Mohd assured the public that police are still actively continuing to track down the remainder of 56 missing person cases that mainly involved those aged below 18. — Picture by Ben Tan
Johor police chief Datuk Mohd Khalil Kader Mohd assured the public that police are still actively continuing to track down the remainder of 56 missing person cases that mainly involved those aged below 18. — Picture by Ben Tan

JOHOR BARU, June 17 — The Johor police clarified today that they have successfully solved more than half of the 143 missing persons cases reported this year, where the majority were reported to have returned safely to their families.

Johor police chief Datuk Mohd Khalil Kader Mohd said a total of 87 out of the 143 missing persons have returned safely to their families either by police assistance or by their own.

He said investigations on the 87 cases that had returned to their families revealed it was mainly due to friends, lovers and family issues.

“Our problems start when the respective families do not report back to the police when the missing person returns home.

“This is important as investigators need to record and update the case status,” Mohd Khalil said at the Johor police contingent headquarters here today.

Out of the remainder 56 missing person’s cases in Johor, the Johor Baru North police district recorder the highest with 15 cases reported, followed by the Kulai police district with 10 cases.

The other police districts recorded single digits with Johor Baru South having seven cases, Iskandar Puteri (eight), Seri Alam (five), Batu Pahat (two), Kluang (two), Kota Tinggi (four), Segamat (one) and Pontian (two). For Muar, Tangkak and Mersing there were no reports.

Mohd Khalil also assured the public that police are still actively continuing to track down the remainder of 56 missing person cases that mainly involved those aged below 18.

He also advised the public to help disseminate proper information if they knew the whereabouts of the missing children and to not believe in allegations associated with harvesting the victims’ organs for sale.

“The issue of missing children due to organ sales is incorrect and will only make people worried and upset,” said Mohd Khalil.

Last month, it was reported in a Malay daily that Johor recorded the highest number of missing persons with 143 missing, followed by Selangor (140), Kuala Lumpur (115), and Sabah (99).