Still more to be done to address corruption in Malaysia, says MACC chief

Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Chief Commissioner Latheefa Koya speaks to reporters at the Sheraton Imperial Kuala Lumpur Hotel December 12, 2019. — Picture by Hari Anggara
Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission Chief Commissioner Latheefa Koya speaks to reporters at the Sheraton Imperial Kuala Lumpur Hotel December 12, 2019. — Picture by Hari Anggara

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 23 — The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) today pledged that the agency will enhance its efforts to curtail corruption in the country.

Chief commissioner Latheefa Koya said the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) of Malaysia released by Transparency International (TI) Malaysia was very encouraging.

According to TI, Malaysia had shown great improvement and had jumped 10 spots to earn 51st placing in the CPI for 2019.

Latheefa said the MACC was proud to know that the nation is heading in the right direction.

“We have actually started on innovative measures to address corruption and will continue to strive for greater transparency, get more participation from stakeholders and strengthen the whistle blower protection management mechanisms.

“We also urge all government administrative bodies at various levels to enhance the unit’s integrity and governance,” Latheefa said in a statement.

Today, Transparency International Malaysia (TI-M) president Dr Muhammad Mohan announced that Malaysia was ranked 51 out of 180 countries in the 2019 TI CPI survey.

Meanwhile, social activist Tan Sri Lee Lam Thye said Malaysia’s improvement in moving 10 places up from 61st placing in 2018 was seen as a promising development.

He said the efforts by the government and all parties including the National Anti-Corruption Plan (NACP) 2019-2023 launched last year have proven to be positive, adding that the public was now aware that corruption is a major enemy that could impede a country’s development.

“The strategy adopted by the government and related parties in introducing various programmes including the NACP has produced results.

“In addition, the MACC’s involvement, campaigns conducted by non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and the private sector had played their role in giving emphasis on good governance and ensuring transparency in daily affairs to make Malaysia corruption free,” Lee told Bernama.

Malaysia Corruption Watch (MCW) deputy president Rozaidi Abdul Rahim Razali said the higher score in the 2019 index was due to the change in the government and the new government’s commitment in its fight against corruption.

He said this included the swift action by the government in handling high profile cases such as the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB), SRC International, Felda and the arrest of several political figures over alleged involvement in corrupt practices and money laundering activities. — Bernama

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