Rosmah absent from court, produces medical certificate

Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor leaves the Kuala Lumpur Court Complex November 15, 2018. — Picture by Azneal Ishak
Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor leaves the Kuala Lumpur Court Complex November 15, 2018. — Picture by Azneal Ishak

KUALA LUMPUR, April 5 — Former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s wife, Datin Seri Rosmah Mansor, did not attend her case mention at the High Court today due to illness.

She is alleged to have solicited and received bribes amounting to RM1.5 million in relation to solar hybrid projects for Sarawak rural schools.

The trial began at 9am, with the defence and prosecution teams seen entering Judge Collin Lawrence Sequerah’s chambers.

After a while, the media was informed that the court wanted to see the ‘Certificate of unfit to attend court’ and postponed proceedings for three hours.

The court resumed proceedings at noon and lawyer Datuk Jagjit Singh, who is representing the former prime minister’s wife, presented the medical certificate and ‘Certificate of unfit to attend court’ to the judge.

“She is unfit to attend court today,” he said.

Deputy Public Prosecutor Datuk Mohd Dusuki Mokhtar then made a verbal application to transfer the solar energy project corruption case involving Rosmah to High Court 2 before Judge Mohamed Zaini Mazlan.

“This is because the money laundering case involving Rosmah and the corruption case of Najib’s former special officer Datuk Rizal Mansor will be heard at the same court (Court 2),” he said.

However, Rosmah’s lawyer Datuk Akberdin Abdul Kader objected on the ground that the prosecution had to make a written application.

The judge set April 23 to hear the application.

On November 15 last year, Rosmah pleaded not guilty at the Sessions Court to two counts of soliciting RM187.5 million and receiving RM1.5 million for projects to provide solar energy to 369 rural schools in Sarawak two years ago.

Rosmah is charged under Section 16(a) (A) of the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) Act  and is punishable under Section 24 of the same Act, which provides an imprisonment for up to 20 years and a fine of not less than five times the amount of the gratification or RM10,000, whichever is higher, upon conviction. — Bernama