No probe on cops who shot woman five times, court told

The High Court was told today that single mother Norizan Salleh’s claim that she was shot five times by the police five years ago was not investigated despite a police report lodge on the matter. This picture taken in the early hours of August 21, 2013 shows Malaysian policemen checking a vehicle at a roadblock in Kuala Lumpur. — AFP pic
The High Court was told today that single mother Norizan Salleh’s claim that she was shot five times by the police five years ago was not investigated despite a police report lodge on the matter. This picture taken in the early hours of August 21, 2013 shows Malaysian policemen checking a vehicle at a roadblock in Kuala Lumpur. — AFP pic

Subscribe to our Telegram channel for the latest updates on news you need to know.


KUALA LUMPUR, May 8 — Authorities did not investigate single mother Norizan Salleh’s claim of attempted murder after she was shot five times by the police five years ago, the High Court was told today.

ASP Tan Chek Yang, who was the senior investigating officer in the case, testified today that he did not conduct a probe after Norizan lodged a police report on the matter, despite the fact she survived being shot at five times during an early morning car chase.

Tan, who is the defence witness in Norizan’s civil suit against the police force, said that the only probe which was conducted was on her claim of assault and battery, which he concluded did not happen after speaking to the medical officer who had examined her as well as the police officers accused of shooting and attacking her.

“No (probe on attempted murder). I only investigated report on assault,” he said.

When asked by Norizan’s lawyer N. Surendran as to why he did not investigate the matter, Tan said that he was merely following orders from his superior officers, whom he did not name.

“It depends on the wisdom of the police. If a madman lodges a police report, should we investigate?” Tan said.

He also testified that no action was taken against Norizan’s assault and battery claims, as there was no physical evidence to suggest so.

Tan added that Norizan was also not called to identify the officers in a suspect line-up as he found the officers’ version of events to be credible.

“Their testimonies were smooth, no lies… it’s also impossible that male police officers would hit a woman,” said Tan.

In response, judge Datuk Hue Siew Kheng replied sarcastically: “That should relieve all the women in this country.”

In 2009, Norizan filed a civil suit against the police for wrongfully shooting her at the Middle Ring Road 2 (MRR2) in the early hours of the morning.

She named a policeman identified only as Mohd Firdaus, the Sentul police chief, the Inspector-General of Police and the government of Malaysia as defendants.

In her statement of claim, she said at 4:30am on October 30, 2009, a police patrol unit approached the car in which she was a passenger and unidentified policemen suddenly opened fire.

Norizan tried to get out but was kicked and stepped on by a person eventually identified as Corporal Mohd Firdaus Rosli. She claimed that by then about 14 to 20 police officers had arrived at the scene.

Mohd Firdaus has denied Norizan’s account of events.

Norizan was taken to Hospital Kuala Lumpur where she underwent surgery, and has also said she had to undergo additional surgery at the National Heart Institute to remove a bullet lodged in her lung.

Norizan lodged a police report on November 11, 2009, claiming the defendants had committed assault and battery.

She has insisted the shooting was unjustified as she had not committed any crime and that the police have yet to charge her with any offence.

Norizan is claiming special damages for unsettled medical bills amounting to RM18,161, general, aggravated and exemplary damages, costs and other relief deemed fit by the court.

The trial will resume tomorrow morning.

Related Articles