A little late, but Sabah Bersih finally kick off 6km ‘walk for democracy’

Sabahans take a break along the Tanjung Lipat waterfront during their 6km ‘walk for democracy’ the morning of August 30, 2015 as part of the Bersih 4 rally that is into its second day. — Picture by Julia Chan
Sabahans take a break along the Tanjung Lipat waterfront during their 6km ‘walk for democracy’ the morning of August 30, 2015 as part of the Bersih 4 rally that is into its second day. — Picture by Julia Chan

KOTA KINABALU, Aug 30 — About an after they were to start, some 500 Bersih 4 supporters in Sabah were finally able to go on their “walk for democracy” along the closed off Tanjung Lipat bay, a popular waterfront and haunt for its views of the sun setting over the sea.

The walk was to kick off at 9am but was delayed after police taped off access Tanjug Lipat as early as 6am today, forcing motorists to take a detour and travel on foot to reach their meeting point by the sea.

A group of the marchers formed an orderly train of about 200m long along the jogging track of the Tanjung Lipat stretch and walked while chanting “Reformasi” and “Bersih”. They also waved the Sabah and Malaysian flags.

Police in a helicopter hovering overhead and marine police on jet skies kept a close watch on the marchers.

The organisers plan for the 6km walk was scheduled for 9am but was put on hold after police blocked off several main roads into and out of the city centre and towards Tanjung Lipat.

The group mobilised at about 10.05am from Likas Bay Park II and walked about 1.5km before taking a break and singing songs at a rest stop in front of the City Mosque.

At another stop several hundred metres on, Bersih Sabah chairman Jannie Lasimbang reminded the people of the five Bersih 4 demands and asked for a peaceful gathering.

Police had taped off at least four entry points into the waterfront stretch as early as 6am citing traffic congestion, but allowed those on foot to proceed.

Last night, some 50 people stayed overnight at the park venue, some in tents while others were content to sleep under the canopy on tarpaulins.

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