Report: Developer wants RM110m in compensation to scrap Rimba Kiara Park project

Khalid was reported saying the government could agree to refund a portion of the land premium and convince them to scale down the project size. ― Picture by Hari Anggara
Khalid was reported saying the government could agree to refund a portion of the land premium and convince them to scale down the project size. ― Picture by Hari Anggara

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 9 — The developer of a high-end condominium project at the Rimba Kiara Park that is facing protest from nearby residents wants RM110 million in compensation if it is to halt development, The Star reported today.

Compensation was among the solutions discussed in the negotiations between the Federal Territories Minister Khalid Samad and the developer, the English daily reported.

“The developer is willing to give up the project if we pay RM110 million as compensation, which is the estimated amount spent on the development so far,” Khalid was quoted saying.

“The developer paid the land premium between RM60 million and RM70 million, and made some changes to the recreational park,” he said.

The report did not state if Putrajaya was seriously considering the idea but Khalid was reported expressing concern about the welfare of the 100 families living in shanty longhouses located near the park where the development is to take place.

The families, many of whom had lived in 37.16sqm wooden longhouses with no rooms there for 36 years, would have been given new homes to be built as part of the project.

Taman Tun Dr. Ismail (TTDI) residents have protested against the proposed housing development which includes, among others, a 29-storey block comprising 350 affordable housing units meant for the longhouse families.

“I think it is an insult. In a Federal Territory, to have families living in that kind of condition for such a long period... we should not allow this to carry on,” Khalid was quoted saying.

“I want to find a solution where we can address the concerns of TTDI residents and get replacement houses for the people and families living in the longhouse,” he added.

The project also features eight blocks of between 42- and 54-storey high-end serviced apartments.

TTDI residents, concerned about the impact of over-development and want the park untouched, have mounted a legal challenge to stop the project.

The group filed a judicial review application with the High Court to annul the conditional planning permission and a development order granted by the Kuala Lumpur City Hall earlier last year, but failed to get a stay order.

The full hearing of the judicial review is fixed for Sept 25 and 26 before Justice Nordin Hassan.

On Putrajaya’s side, negotiations with the developer are ongoing. Khalid was reported saying the government could agree to refund a portion of the land premium and convince them to scale down the project size.

“We will obviously have to refund a portion of the premium. The developer was given 4.85ha land and we are trying to negotiate with them to reduce the acreage for the development and the number of blocks,” he said.

“To me, eight residential blocks sound a bit extreme. The longhouse and a temple span about four acres.

“We might need another extra two acres to house the longhouse residents temporarily while the developer builds the apartments on the existing longhouse land,” he added.

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