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You don’t understand us, Harapan — Izzat Johari

APRIL 15 — I’m a fence-sitter when it comes to politics. I take the side of whoever makes most sense, so that my family and I can continue to enjoy a decent quality of life through stable jobs, access to opportunities, a safe and peaceful environment and a government that is responsive to people’s needs.

But in these past few months, I cannot say my mind is at peace as I watch politicians from both sides of the divide sling mud at each other.

Instead of telling us as voters why we should choose them and their policies, we have vicious name-calling and character assassinations taking place on stages nationwide. These are then broadcasted to the masses. What examples are they trying to set? Are these politicians ready for the repercussions of widening societal chasms through such irresponsible politicking?

Barisan Nasional is the devil we know how to deal with but I cannot deny that I am worried about putting all eggs into the Pakatan Harapan basket.

More specifically, it is a worry of track record. Harapan has clearly shown over the past year that the only thing holding the coalition’s parties together is a common desire to oust Najib and gain federal power, fuelled by hatred in most instances.

There does not appear to be one strong common ideology strongly binding them together. They have found it impossible to cooperate on a number of issues including how they handled state leadership when they ousted former Selangor Menteri Besar Tan Sri Khalid Ibrahim. HRH Sultan Selangor had to intervene due to their failure to provide suitable options for MB candidates in Selangor.

Another classic example of discord within the coalition is the fact that Harapan released a manifesto, but a man whom I have high respects for, Tun Mahathir who leads the coalition, seems to have a manifesto of his own. Where Harapan says it will remove toll charges gradually, he says that that isn’t practical. So what is it then?

One cannot help but have slight tendencies to agree with the “Harapan Palsu” story that’s being propagated by BN.

It is also worrying that political parties helmed by experienced politicians in the Opposition coalition are so unaware of requirements from the Registrar of Societies it opens them up to the risk of having to register at such a crucial time? Can these people even be trusted to run a Government?

I am really confused, in fact many of my peers are.

I am also concerned about big issues like water cuts in Selangor and irresponsible development that led to massive floods in Penang last year. I have not seen strong leadership from Harapan emerge to address these issues.

Yes, Harapan component parties seem to have found a common purpose for now, willing to sacrifice their own beliefs (and even logos) to unite to bring down Najib. But if they do win, and Najib is ousted, the very thing that’s holding them together disappears.

If they have found it impossible to form a shadow cabinet until now, the same circumstances would prevent them from forming a proper Cabinet to run the country.

Inability to govern would be destructive for the economy and people’s livelihoods.

There’s only so much hate-mongering can do and it is pretty cool to support Harapan, or made to be seen as cool, but after that, what? It is down to bread and butter for us Malaysians, it is down to delivery and performance because I want to be sure there’s stability and results which puts money in my pockets to pay bills, and food on the table.

We cannot survive on ideals alone, we need to see real political will to find solutions for the people — not their own internal problems. People like me especially, who prefer stability over chaos will find it difficult to buy into the idea of an uncertain future under Harapan.

*This is the personal opinion of the writer and does not necessarily represent the views of Malay Mail Online.

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