Volkswagen says considering board ‘changes’, may name new CEO

File picture shows Herbert Diess from the Volkswagen Group presenting the new I.D. Vizzion car model during an event at the 88th International Motor Show at Palexpo in Geneva, Switzerland, March 5, 2018. — Reuters pic
File picture shows Herbert Diess from the Volkswagen Group presenting the new I.D. Vizzion car model during an event at the 88th International Motor Show at Palexpo in Geneva, Switzerland, March 5, 2018. — Reuters pic

FRANKFURT AM MAIN, April 10 — Scandal-hit car giant Volkswagen said today it was considering reshuffling its board and that chief executive Matthias Mueller could be replaced, although no decision has yet been made.

“The Volkswagen group is considering further evolving the leadership structure, which could be connected with changes in the board... a change to the chief executive could be involved,” VW said in a statement.

Supervisory board chief Hans Dieter Poetsch had been “speaking with different members of the supervisory and executive boards” about moving or replacing some of them, it went on, adding that Mueller “signalled he was open to play a part in the changes.”

Business newspaper Handelsblatt reported that Herbert Diess, head of the VW brand — one of the group’s 12 makes of cars, trucks and motorbikes — was slated to take Mueller’s place.

Volkswagen did not respond immediately when contacted about the report.

Mueller, a former chief executive of VW subsidiary Porsche, was brought in to replace Martin Winterkorn.

The long-time CEO quit after the firm admitted in 2015 to manipulating 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide to cheat regulatory emissions tests in a scandal that became known as “dieselgate.”

Mueller has chivvied the mammoth carmaker into a massive restructuring, aiming to electrify many of its lines and slim down its massive operations over the coming decades.

But he himself has landed in prosecutors’ sights over suspicions he may have known about the diesel cheating before it became public and failed in his duty to inform investors.

Last month, Mueller said that chief executives of big companies deserved high pay because “one always has one foot in jail”. — AFP

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