More than rest of world, Malaysian parents want better school computers

According to a survey, Malaysian parents want additional allocations to be channeled towards computing equipment for students. — AFP pic
According to a survey, Malaysian parents want additional allocations to be channeled towards computing equipment for students. — AFP pic

KUALA LUMPUR, March 15 — Six in 10 Malaysian parents in a global survey would spend extra school funds on computers and technology, the highest of any country in the Global Parents Survey.

The figure was derived from the 1,000 Malaysian parents surveyed by the Varkey Foundation that commissioned the study, beating the global average of 46 per cent that wanted additional allocations to be channeled towards computing equipment for students.

The proportion who preferred using excess funds for computing outstripped those who wanted these for better building infrastructure (45 per cent), extracurricular activities (43 per cent), school resources (43 per cent), and even teachers (42 per cent).

The preference also bucked the global trend, where 50 per cent of parents worldwide chose better pay for teachers as the main area they would send additional school funds, ahead of computers, extracurricular activities, and school resources.

“Some of the highest demand for spending additional funds on teachers was in Western Europe with 76 per cent of parents in Germany — the highest of any country surveyed — 70 per cent in the UK and 65 per cent in France.

“There was also high demand in the US (67 per cent). The lowest demand for spending additional funds on teachers was in Indonesia (22 per cent),” the survey said.

The survey also found that 37 per cent of Malaysian parents said that they spend seven hours or more a week helping their children with academic matters. Indian parents were the most involved, with 60 per cent saying they did so.

Fourteen per cent of Malaysian parents said they were not sufficiently qualified to help their children with school work, behind China (24 per cent) Singapore (18 per cent), and Japan (17 per cent).

On the preference for free-to-attend school management, 63 per cent of Malaysian parents felt that private companies and teachers would do justice in running such schooling system.

“Malaysian parents were much happier for private companies to run free-to-attend schools, than parents in European countries, such as the UK (23 per cent) and France (24 per cent).

“Almost three quarters (74 per cent) of Malaysian parents would approve of groups of teachers running free-to-attend schools, higher than in any other country surveyed, apart from India (82 per cent),” the survey read.

The Varkey Foundation partnered with Ipsos, a global market research and consulting firm, to conduct the study.

Ipsos performed 27,361 online surveys in 29 countries, polling between December 8 last year and January 15 this year.

The data was adjusted to be representative of parents with schooling children aged between four and 18, with equal views from mothers and fathers.

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