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Deputy MB: Kelantan to model Qatar’s hudud law, including amputation

Deputy Mentri Besar Datuk Mohd Amar Nik Abdullah (left) stressed that Kelantan’s currently dormant hudud enactment can only enforced after a private member’s Bill by Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang is passed in the Parliament. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa
Deputy Mentri Besar Datuk Mohd Amar Nik Abdullah (left) stressed that Kelantan’s currently dormant hudud enactment can only enforced after a private member’s Bill by Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang is passed in the Parliament. — Picture by Yusof Mat Isa

KUALA LUMPUR, Jan 3 — The Kelantan government will study ways of adopting Qatar’s implementation of hudud, the Islamic penal law, said Deputy Mentri Besar Datuk Mohd Amar Nik Abdullah.

According to Mohd Amar, the state will allocate RM1 million to research how best to implement hudud that includes amputation, whipping and stoning for some offences.

“Qatar is one of the best models to follow the process of hudud implementation,” he was quoted as saying in Sinar Harian.

Currently, the PAS vice president said the state lacked the expertise and knowledge to perform some of the procedures necessary for selected hudud punishments, such as the surgical removal of limbs.

Theft, for instance, is punishable by the amputation of a hand in some instances. There is no equivalent to this in the country’s criminal law.

“According to experts, surgeons can execute the hand-cutting punishment and it doesn’t have to be by an Algojo (executioner).

“We want to use a surgeon to avoid any damages to the remaining parts of the limb,” he was quoted saying.

However, Mohd Amar stressed that Kelantan’s currently dormant hudud enactment can only enforced after a private member’s Bill by Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang is passed in the Parliament.

The Bill aims to increase the Shariah courts’ sentencing limits to 30 years’ jail, RM100,000 fine and 100 lashes as among others.

Despite Amar’s latest remarks, PAS and Hadi have repeatedly insisted that the Bill would not lead to hudud in Malaysia.

In a separate report, Kelantan chief Shariah judge Datuk Daud Muhammad said the amputation of limbs was not something that would be enforced indiscriminately.

He added that there were many aspects to consider before delivering such a punishment.

“It is not necessary to cut the hand for stealing… we must see the circumstances, such as whether (the thief) was desperately acting out of hunger or other causes that led to the crime,” he was quoted as saying.

Daud said amputations have been overly sensationalised just to cause fear amongst thieves and wrongdoers in the state.

“God willing, we will not have to reach that extent. It is, however, important to have and empower the law,” he was quoted saying.

Daud said Shariah courts in the state were already prepared to implement hudud, adding that they were also prepared in terms of infrastructure.

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