Reports of young Malaysian footballer facing court action in Germany inaccurate, says source

Former Selangor United player Muhammad Diniz Irwan trains in Germany to pursue his dream of becoming a professional footballer. — Picture courtesy of Facebook/Diniz Irwan
Former Selangor United player Muhammad Diniz Irwan trains in Germany to pursue his dream of becoming a professional footballer. — Picture courtesy of Facebook/Diniz Irwan

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KUALA LUMPUR, April 20 — Claims that young national footballer Muhammad Diniz Irwan faces legal action and risk imprisonment in Germany for failing to settle his school fees arrears is inaccurate.

Media reports stating that the 20-year-old owed some €33,000 (RM163,874.69) in school fees since October last year is also untrue, a source told Bernama.

“The arrears actually stands at €10,272.68 (RM50,960.11) and if it remains unsettled, then his contract with the school ends and he can’t attend classes until the fees are settled.

“If this happens, his visa will also not be renewed and he will have to return to Malaysia by June 2 the latest,” the source added.

Muhammad Diniz enrolled at the European School RheinMain in Frankfurt upon arrival in Germany in February last year to pursue his dream of becoming a professional footballer.

The former Selangor United player, who was called for the Under-18 national squad’s centralised training, worked on his potential further in Germany by playing for Eddersheim FC’s reserve squad, although it is understood that the stint did not come with a professional contract.

Local media recently reported that Muhammad Diniz will be brought to court in Germany in the near future and risk being imprisoned if he fails to settle his school fee arrears, which in turn could likely shatter his dream of becoming a professional player.

The source said the school had never stated in its letter that a student would be brought to court or jailed for failing to pay school fees.

The school in question, the source added, was in fact a private school and not a semi-government learning institution as reported.

“Media reports concerning the courts or prisons involving the German government cannot be taken lightly. Laws there cannot be misinterpreted and used to gain sympathy or for individual interest,” the source said. — Bernama