James Cameron reveals why he almost hit Harvey Weinstein 20 years ago

James Cameron recalls his altercation with disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein 20 years ago in a recent interview. — Reuters pic
James Cameron recalls his altercation with disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein 20 years ago in a recent interview. — Reuters pic

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LOS ANGELES, Nov 27 — In an interview with Vanity Fair just two days ago on the cusp of mega hit Titanic’s 20th anniversary, director James Cameron reveals how he almost came to blows with now disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein.

Cameron recalls that he almost hit Weinstein with his Oscar statuette but was prevented from doing so by a return from commercial break.

Cameron said, “The music had started to play to get back in our seats. The people around us were saying, ‘Not here! Not here!’ Like it was okay to fight in the parking lot, you know, but it was not okay there when the music was playing, and they were about to go live.”

When asked about what triggered the argument, the famous director said that it was over Miramax’s treatment of fellow director and friend Guillermo del Toro on his film Mimic. 

“Harvey came up glad-handing me, talking about how great they were for the artist, and I just read him chapter and verse about how great I thought he was for the artist based on my friend’s experience, and that led to an altercation.”

Cameron said that in light of the barrage of sexual misconduct allegations against Weinstein now, many people would have been glad had he played through on that one.

Weinstein has been accused of sexual harassment by more than 50 women tod date and is currently under investigation by the police. The allegations against him have also triggered a flood of other allegations against other high-profile names including actor Kevin Spacey and Republican Roy Moore.

Weinstein has denied any allegations of non-consensual sex but has been expelled from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

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