Johor govt reminds Malaysian workers returning from Singapore to strictly adhere to self-quarantine order

Before the MCO was implemented on March 18, an estimated 300,000 Malaysians commuted from Johor daily to work in Singapore. — Reuters pic
Before the MCO was implemented on March 18, an estimated 300,000 Malaysians commuted from Johor daily to work in Singapore. — Reuters pic

JOHOR BARU, April 7 — The Johor government today reminded all Malaysian workers who have returned due to the one-month lockdown of Singapore to strictly adhere to their 14-day self-quarantine order.

Johor Health and Environment Committee chairman R. Vidyananthan reminded those under self-quarantine that they are not allowed to leave their homes except for urgent matters.

He said self-quarantine also includes practising good personal hygiene such as the frequent washing of hands with soap or hand sanitiser and using a face mask while maintaining a one-metre distance when interacting with family members.

“They are also required to monitor their personal health and to immediately notify the health authorities if they show symptoms such as cough, fever and a cold,” said Vidyananthan in a statement today.

He was commenting on returning Malaysian workers to the state who are required to self-quarantine following the one-month lockdown of Singapore, dubbed a “circuit breaker”, that starts today.

The move has impacted an estimated 45,000 Malaysians who continued to work in the island republic following the extension of the movement control order (MCO) to April 14.

Some have since returned, an exodus that began over the weekend.

Before the MCO was implemented on March 18, an estimated 300,000 Malaysians commuted from Johor daily to work in Singapore.

On the issue of local companies in Johor flouting the MCO, Vidyananthan said the state government received a total of 946 complaints with 36 investigated from March 18 to April 6.

“As a result of investigations, only four employers were found to have failed to comply with the MCO and have been given notices of closure despite being advised by a special enforcement team,” he said.

Vidyananthan, who represents the state government on the MCO and Covid-19 updates, reminded the public that the Johor Labour Department and the state’s Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH) have been empowered under Sections 3 and 18 (1) (F) of Act 342 in relation to action taken against companies conducting business operations during the MCO period.

He said among the types of complaints received and have been investigated are related to companies operating or acting without the consent of the authorities during the MCO.

“This includes companies that are not categorised as essential services, the termination of employment (for regular, voluntary, temporary and reduction of salaries), non-payment of wages during the MCO period, employees being forced by companies to take unpaid leave and also failure to comply with the requirements set by the authorities,” said Vidyananthan.

 


 

Related Articles