No monkeypox infection detected in Johor

Johor Health, Culture and Heritage Committee chairman Mohd Khuzzan Abu Bakar said no monkeypox infection has been detected and reported in the state. — Picture by Ben Tan
Johor Health, Culture and Heritage Committee chairman Mohd Khuzzan Abu Bakar said no monkeypox infection has been detected and reported in the state. — Picture by Ben Tan

JOHOR BARU, May 21 — There is no monkeypox infection detected and reported in this state as of today, said Johor’s Health, Culture and Heritage Committee chairman Mohd Khuzzan Abu Bakar.

However, he said the Johor State Health Department (JKNJ) took precautionary measures following the monkeypox case detected in Singapore, involving a 38-year-old Nigerian.

The department also took action in preventing this monkeypox infection which includes increasing its surveillance activities at all of Johor’s entrance, especially those with a history of visiting Nigeria.

“Information related to this monkeypox disease is also distributed to all healthcare personnel including frontline staff to detect early suspect cases if any,” he said in a statement here today.

The instructions were also given to report immediately if there was a suspected case of monkeypox to the Crisis Preparedness Response Centre (CPRC) operational room, he said.

Meanwhile, those who visit monkeypox endemic countries (central and western Africa), are advised to avoid contact with wild animals and not to eat its meat.

They are also encouraged to practice personal hygiene including keeping hands clean with soap and water as well as using alcohol-based sanitisers when no water or soap is available.

On May 9, the Singapore Ministry of Health (MOH) in a statement confirmed a monkeypox case had been detected involving a 38-year-old Nigerian patient, who attended a workshop in the country on April 28.

The patient with symptomatic fever, muscle aches and rashes, was tested positive for the monkeypox infection and was transferred to the isolation ward at the republic’s National Infectious Disease Centre (NCID).

The cause of the monkeypox virus was identified through the bushmeat that was eaten at a wedding ceremony. — Bernama

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