Home Ministry putting security laws under microscope to avoid flip-flopping

Azis told the Lower House during Question Time today that the study by the Special Committee on Law Review and the Technical Committee will take time to avoid backtracking from any announcements. — Bernama pic
Azis told the Lower House during Question Time today that the study by the Special Committee on Law Review and the Technical Committee will take time to avoid backtracking from any announcements. — Bernama pic

KUALA LUMPUR, April 2 — The Home Ministry is conducting an in-depth study and review of six security laws in its purview before making any recommendations to the Cabinet, said Deputy Home Minister Datuk Mohd Azis Jamman.

He told the Lower House during Question Time today that the study by the Special Committee on Law Review and the Technical Committee will take time to avoid backtracking from any announcements.

“I take note of the promises made in the Pakatan Harapan manifesto during the last general election. But when we want to amend or abolish an Act, it must be done carefully so our decision will not be a flip-flop.

“Currently, the Home Ministry is studying all aspects (of the six laws, including the sections) and the views given by the two committees. The Home Ministry will then submit their recommendations to the Cabinet,” said Azis.

The six laws under review are the Security Offences (Special Measures) Act 2012 (Sosma), Prevention of Crime Act 1959 (Poca), Prevention of Terrorism Act 2015 (Pota), Sedition Act 1948, Peaceful Assembly Act 2012 and the Printing Press and Publications Act 1984.

The members of the two committees include representatives from the Royal Malaysia Police, the Attorney General’s Chambers, the Bar Council, Suhakam, legal practitioners and academics.

In his supplementary question, Datuk Seri Ronald Kiandee (PH-Beluran) said the PH government appeared unwilling to amend the laws, before asking what changes were required to them.

Azis replied saying that the government intends to table the findings in Parliament as soon as possible but will not be do so in the current meeting due to the time-consuming nature of the study.